: Cutting tires


01duramax6spd
01-10-2008, 01:37 AM
I cut some big scraper and coal mine tires for dispozal and I'm trying to find a way to cut them easier. Been using a sawzall and it's a pain in the @$$ and hard. Any ideas what would cut them good? We're talking 2"-4" of rubber with a bit of steel mixed in. There is a company with a cutter but obviously they are my competitor and won't tell me what they use and I need something soon.
Thanks in advance.

keydl
01-10-2008, 04:23 AM
Have you tried an abrasive blade in a skill saw?

Jack the bead so that it wants to ease away rather than pinch the blade.

Beverly shears will cut the sidewall - $200 from Enco

What are the local rules? Here it is 3 pieces, so I do sidewalls and tread.

The commercial tool is a hydraulic beverly shear that will cut to the center. Push it on with a bobcat and make 3 cuts.

Up to 24.5 I just use a knife, unless the sidewall is steel or arimide.

keydl

NukleusX
01-10-2008, 05:06 AM
try a disc grinder (larger than 4" disc obviously)?

large band saw?

maybe chuck norris could help...

01duramax6spd
01-10-2008, 02:00 PM
Have you tried an abrasive blade in a skill saw?

Jack the bead so that it wants to ease away rather than pinch the blade.

Beverly shears will cut the sidewall - $200 from Enco

What are the local rules? Here it is 3 pieces, so I do sidewalls and tread.

The commercial tool is a hydraulic beverly shear that will cut to the center. Push it on with a bobcat and make 3 cuts.

Up to 24.5 I just use a knife, unless the sidewall is steel or arimide.

keydl

I'm trying to cut them 10" into the tread so I have a 28" deep water tank left and the 10" piece I have another use for :Thumbup: . Zero waste is the plan so I don't have any issues with the EPA. I've just been taking sidewalls out and that's easy with a sawzall but there is waste and apparently the EPA doesn't want that.

circle5
01-10-2008, 02:38 PM
LOL we've always used a sawzall as well!!

ovruigo
01-10-2008, 02:54 PM
Use a Demolition Saw

01duramax6spd
01-11-2008, 03:12 AM
Use a Demolition Saw

Like one for concrete? What kind of blade?

ovruigo
01-11-2008, 01:22 PM
Like one for concrete? What kind of blade?

Yes, one for concrete. Use a metal blade, they are the black blades with the fiberous material in them like the ones used for a grinder.

Zaairman
01-11-2008, 03:34 PM
Yep, I think a concrete saw would work good, or a sawzall with a more aggressive blade.

keydl
01-12-2008, 03:26 AM
The chop saw blade for ferrous in a concrete saw, larger blade and much more HP than a skill saw.

Metal cutting blade for the wires in the tires, they are not very thick and will kook up on big toothed blades.

Skill saw with a flooring blade will cut the bead but they don't last. I never had many to cut so never paid close attention to the cost other than cutting costs more than burning.

keydl

Dual K20s
01-12-2008, 04:15 AM
Were talking car tires right, like 25-35" range? Cause we've tried cutting loader tires and it don't work for **** with a sawzall. The rubber heats up and the blade sticks and the saw moves :damnit:

keydl
01-12-2008, 04:35 AM
That is why you put the jack in the tire to make it want to spread for the blade.

Cutting sidewalls a wedge to spread the cut, cutting beads a jack.

That is why I use abrasive wheel, skill saw will get most worn loader tires, all turf tires and truck tires.

Car and poly truck tires cut with a knife.

keydl

imported_cummins_power
01-12-2008, 04:52 AM
John Deere makes a metal cutting skill saw that seemed to work pretty wel on a combine tire, only about 3" thick though.

01duramax6spd
01-12-2008, 02:08 PM
Were talking car tires right, like 25-35" range? Cause we've tried cutting loader tires and it don't work for **** with a sawzall. The rubber heats up and the blade sticks and the saw moves :damnit:

NO,we're talking 72"-144" range :popcorn: . Up to 60" wide. One guy has a cutter similar to a log splitter with a big hydrolic and an edge on a piece of steel. Haven't seen it only heard about it. I need to get something figured out so I can make business a little better.

Copper
01-14-2008, 09:40 PM
We had a holding jig when we did that a few years ago (same application, bull-proof stock tanks:splat ) - had a couple long pieces of channel from an old plow frame we'd park the loader tractor on the ends of, lay the tire flat across the ends of it, c-clamp the lower bead to it, then chain a couple c-clamps hooked to the top bead to the bucket and pull 'er up - basically pulling the two beads away from each other. Then a sawzall and an oil can, away you'd go. it made the cut open up really good behind the blade, and the oil kept it cool(er) and not so apt to bind up. I used fairly coarse blades, they left a wider kerf (less binding) and were just plain faster. We could chop one in half in about 10 minutes once we got going on 'em.

Hosspuller
01-14-2008, 09:59 PM
I cut some big scraper and coal mine tires for dispozal and I'm trying to find a way to cut them easier. Been using a sawzall and it's a pain in the @$$ and hard. Any ideas what would cut them good? We're talking 2"-4" of rubber with a bit of steel mixed in. There is a company with a cutter but obviously they are my competitor and won't tell me what they use and I need something soon.
Thanks in advance.
Check with a nearby cat or John deere dealer for disposal methods.

ovruigo
01-14-2008, 10:05 PM
I cut some for an artificial creek wall using a demo saw. To cut one in half took about a minute with out using jacks jigs chains or ropes. The recipricating motion of a sawzall seems less efficient seeing as how you have to, strap, wedge, or jack the tire walls so the saw wont beat ya to death. That seems like it would take at the very least 10-15 minutes to do before you can even start cutting the tire.

01duramax6spd
01-14-2008, 11:22 PM
Basically the method I use for taking sidewalls out but a little different
Did you ever cut them in the tread? I'm wanting to cut in the tread instead of just taking sidewalls out. Some people are complaining that they 37.25"x35"s are too deep for calves which they are and I have a plan to use the rest of the tire for farm/fanch use too :Thumbup: .

I have a hydrolic cutter designed that I think will work slick and cut them with a lot less effort.

We had a holding jig when we did that a few years ago (same application, bull-proof stock tanks:splat ) - had a couple long pieces of channel from an old plow frame we'd park the loader tractor on the ends of, lay the tire flat across the ends of it, c-clamp the lower bead to it, then chain a couple c-clamps hooked to the top bead to the bucket and pull 'er up - basically pulling the two beads away from each other. Then a sawzall and an oil can, away you'd go. it made the cut open up really good behind the blade, and the oil kept it cool(er) and not so apt to bind up. I used fairly coarse blades, they left a wider kerf (less binding) and were just plain faster. We could chop one in half in about 10 minutes once we got going on 'em.

01duramax6spd
02-17-2008, 03:53 PM
I built a hydrolic cutter {shear type} and it doesn't work worth a crap so far,so back to the drawing board.

01duramax6spd
07-01-2013, 12:38 AM
I was reading old threads and found this one I started. I can't believe how far things have come in 5yrs :woohoo. We now process a ****load of OTR tires for tire tanks and serve 7 states so if anyone needs tire stock tanks let us know. The website is kinda small and lacking but we haven't had time to build a big one yet

www.midwesttiretanks.com