The Diesel Garage banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Those using 2 stroke oil in fuel what amount are you using per gallon or tank full?
Thanks Ed
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
44 Posts
1 oz per gallon
 
  • Like
Reactions: deereman39

·
Eddy
Joined
·
85 Posts
Ive been using 1 oz per gallon also. SuperTech from walmart. I use the ashless version. TC-W3. buy it in the gallon. It's cheaper that way. On a side note. I have increased my mix to 1.25 to 1.5 oz per gallon. Still doing some reading but, if our regular mix for lawn mowers, chain saws etc.... is 1oz per gallon for proper lubrication. I would think a little more would be needed looking at the size difference between our injectors and quantity 8 and a lawn mower?? Any feedback is welcomed on my theory.
 
  • Like
Reactions: deereman39

·
Eddy
Joined
·
85 Posts
Double post. Deleted.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
274 Posts
you could probably run 50/50 without hurting anything besides your wallet. The intent is to increase the lubricity. The fuel may not be a super lubricant, but it is not without some level of lubricity. Therefore all you really need is to supplement it a bit. The 1 oz/gal, was a result of lubricity tests in the lab that showed the improvement to be well above the fuel system manufacturers specs
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,051 Posts
Heres some thoughts on the use of 2 cycle tcw3 outboard motor oils...

2 cycle tcw3 outboard motor oils is what some use as a lubricity enhancer for diesel fuel.

These oils have a typical flash point of 200-300F, but that only means they will vaporize at those temps and are available to ignite if they have an ignition source...such as a spark plug...which our diesels do not have. Our diesel engines rely on auto ignition by compression and heat.

So, "auto ignition" temp specs is what you want to see in 2 cycle oil to make sure it is burning thoroughly...which in most tcw3 rated mineral based oils is between 599-608F.

Typical no.2 diesel fuel "auto ignition" temp is between 489-545F.

Our diesel engines produce more than enough actual combustion temps to burn off the ashless cleaner burning tcw3 2 cycle mineral oils, especially in the lean 200:1 averages of .5oz to 1 gallon. Actual combustion temps in the cylinders can exceed 2500F. Egt's are not combustion temps, but are cooled exhaust temps after the combustion process, which are typically 600-1200F in our motors.

Some no.2 diesel fuels like those sold in California, now require a minimum of 2-5% bio diesel in the fuel sold at the pump...so with that you are getting plenty of lubricity already.

Problem in my area is, one never knows what your getting at the pump.

Using .5 oz of tcw3 per gal in cold climate regions due to all the solvents-anti gel additives used in winter blends might be a good idea.

Harry
 
  • Like
Reactions: Eddy

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
I do not know of anywhere that does not have Bio in the fuel ,it is a cetain booster.
I am not a fan of adding anything to the fuel, especially for a problem that does not exist.
I worked on class eights they use as much fuel in one day, as many of us do in a month, very few ever use anything in their fuel, an anti-gel, if they are traveling north in the winter months. Many of them go millions of miles, without ever having an injector problem, when I did an overhaul at a million miles, I never changed the injectors.
You can add whatever you want, Harry has me convinced the striction aditive he likes is a good idea, what I found is that the people that add the most additives have the most problems.
Just a thought!
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
274 Posts
While I don't see the need for additives to be so important it could also be that those people are more aware of how their engine runs. Myself I don't really get too religious about running an additve. When I do it's just the archoil oil and fuel additives. However at 125000 I split an injector tip and the other 7 all tested out of parameters for "over delivery" , certainly could be a wear/lubricity issue. Still run awesome right up until the last 8 hours of engine time
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,051 Posts
Injector nozzle-tip cracks or splits can be a result of low fuel pressure or water in the fuel, or just defective manufacturing or wear and tear.

When your injector tip split did it take out the engine?

Injector nozzle-tip failures can be very serious, and I have seen them destroy an engine.

Harry
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
274 Posts
As far as I know the engine is "ok". It was smoking black and getting heavier by the hour. After it went white (I assume that's when the tip actually cracked) it only ran a minute or two. Tip was cracked but no pieces actually flaked off
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top