The Diesel Garage banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can someone explain to me how these work... Just curious :shrug:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
You have two gears, one running inside of the other with a sleeve between the two seperating them. One gear is connected to one axle shaft and the other gear is connected to the other shaft. When air is supplied a third gear that is part of the sleeve slides in between the gears on each axle shaft so that they are now effectively one unit.

That is a REALLY simplified way to explain the principle of one, they function about like lock in/lock out hubs do and just move a gear or pin to lock the diff together.

Duke, you have played with a few, care to step in and tell us more details and specifics?
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
All I've ever seen we're Pics of it...I couldn't figure out how the Air got to the Gears ..that we're rotating??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
I know the principle behind it Phil, but I have never installed an ARB so that part of the question I can only guess at.

Ohhh Duke????? Your name is being called. LOL
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I get the Concept of the Locker part..I guess my question is how the Air lockes it??? Thats the part I don't get, with alll the parts turning in there..I guess I'd just have to see one to know??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
I am guessing here Phil but would it not be like pin that is normaly retracted with the pressure of a spring. But when you pressurize the line, the air pressure overcomes the spring pressure and pushes the pin out causing the gears to lock together. I would imagine all this would take place stopped instead of on the go. I am just guessing here. It might be kind of like air brakes on a big truck. :shrug: Dude those ARBs are high. If I did do one I would go ARB in the back and a lockrite in the front. The fronts you can turn the hubs out anyway right. I will warn you though if you lock the CJ you might force me too lock the Yota unless I can find a jeep by then.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I seen one the other day and it worked real smooth..Just curious how it worked???

I figured that the Air pressure would push the Gears together...I just couldn't get it thought my head how it pushed it with the entire unit spinning?

And no Den not one for the CJ...I can barley afford a Lincoln locker for it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Okay, I did some looking around and THINK I have a clue.

Picture an air hose reel, it rotates and still holds air pressure at the seal right? An ARB has to have a similar deal on the end of the carrier away from the ring gear to transfer the air to the internals of the unit. Once in there it works a piston to move the aforementioned gear.

Clear as mud??
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
O.K. .I guess??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
How about like the CAD unit in a dodge front end? It has a shift fork in a collar, the fork moves with vaccume, and pushed the spinning collar?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Very similar in principle, the biggest difference with and ARB is no shift fork, there is/was one one the market that had a shift fork worked by a cable. An ARB has a small chamber inside of it with a piston that pushes the gears into engagement.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Billy...I think I understand the Concept more now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
wideopen said:
Thanks Billy...I think I understand the Concept more now

In other words, "Quit confusing me" LOL LOL

I hope I helped more than I hurt.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Naw really you enlightened me on how it works..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Glad I could help :Thumbup:
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
571 Posts
You're pretty much right on. The air comes in through the housing, then to one side of the carrier near the bearing. (like the air hose reel you were talking about)
They work very well, although sometime (rarely) will develope a leak internally that can be pretty anoying.
Toyota has a factory locker that originally was cable operated, moving an internal fork. But since the late 80's they've come with a small electric motor to actuate the the fork. 4Runners, Landcruisers and Tacomas are available with them.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
560 Posts
ARBs are especially prone to air leaks too...they are sealed with orings...one nick and your air locker doesn't work.

Terra has it's T-Locker...then there is the Ox-locker...and the E-Locker...I believe these all use a shift fork...and externally mounted actuators.

But yes, you end up running an air line to the front diff, drilling a hole in the housing, and needing an aircompressor to run the whole thing. I don't like the air locker because I have seen them not engage when needed because of airleaks...not a pretty site.

steved
 

·
AKA - FFpsd
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
FIREBALL said:
You're pretty much right on. The air comes in through the housing, then to one side of the carrier near the bearing. (like the air hose reel you were talking about)
They work very well, although sometime (rarely) will develope a leak internally that can be pretty anoying.
Toyota has a factory locker that originally was cable operated, moving an internal fork. But since the late 80's they've come with a small electric motor to actuate the the fork. 4Runners, Landcruisers and Tacomas are available with them.

What years use the cable and what vehicles? Im guessing that is the best way to lock your hubs (most reliable).

Thanks Jason
 

·
'Ol Builder guy
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
All of these systems are able to fail. Cable actuated lockers I've used before can fail from stretching or cable breakage at the worst possible time, too.

My ARB's been on for 5 years and never failed on my F-450. The little compressor also operates my air ride seat and pumps up flat tires, etc.

I like an ARB or manually actuated locker because when it's off, it leaves you an open rear, which really comes in handy when you don't want a rear or front axle locked (ice, snow, etc)

If you want a great "automatic" locker, get a Detroit Tru Trac locker.
 

·
Haulin' Azz
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
I'm with Duke on this one. I inquired last year about them and installed front and rear on my 02 F250 XLT4x4 Rcab . Truck gets used mostly on my property. Alot of softer fields and so on . Truck is like nite & day with them.

PSD350 from another site did these pics on his plowtruck during the install .The last truck pic is the truck I got them installed on . Sorry she is a gasser ! :shrug:
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top