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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any problems with leaving my truck plugged in for long periods of time?

I'm talkin like from say Friday night after work to maybe Sunday...or even when I get home at 4pm to when I leave the next morning at 6am?

I live in an apartment so electricity consumption is not an issue.


It's a 2002 F350 superduty, 7.3L 6spd with the standard add ons of chip, exhaust, filter.....ect....



Thanks!
Adam
 

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I would assume it would shorten the life expectancy of the heater.
Other than that :shrug:
 

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no problems at all.....mine has been left plugged in for days at a time before.




kevin
 

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Other then wasting power and wearing it out quicker, there is no issues. I think the cost of a 1700watt timer is about $30 at home depot... a lot cheaper then the 100 the dealer will nail you on for a new heater...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Guys!


One more question:

How long does the heater need to be plugged in to be effective at say 30 degrees, and also at 0 degrees?


Thanks!
 

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Someone can and please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe through discussions that have taken place on this issue before, that 2-3 hours is all that is required to efficiently warm up the block before start up. I know that's what i do, I use a timer set to come on at 3:00 am so it's ready to go at 6:30 am when i leave the house. Hope this helps ya, Gene. :mafia
 

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01blkf250 said:
Someone can and please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe through discussions that have taken place on this issue before, that 2-3 hours is all that is required to efficiently warm up the block before start up. I know that's what i do, I use a timer set to come on at 3:00 am so it's ready to go at 6:30 am when i leave the house. Hope this helps ya, Gene. :mafia

:Thumbup: :Thumbup: :Thumbup: :Thumbup: :Thumbup: :Thumbup: :Thumbup:

fully agreed Gene...mine is now on for like 3 hours, and it starts just fine!!!!!




Kevin
 

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Copenhagen250r said:
Thanks Guys!


One more question:

How long does the heater need to be plugged in to be effective at say 30 degrees, and also at 0 degrees?


Thanks!
Hello:

If you are talking the Ford PSD freeze plug block heater - based on my last year in AK with a 95 Powerstroke (I think it is a 1,000 watt resistance coil embedded in a freeze plug) , three to four hours should be good to a little below 0 Farenheit. Regardless of Ford's claim you don't need to use the block heater till whatever - 20 F, 0 F - it definitely assures a faster start & warm up. Now when it gets cold, say 30 - 40 below F, all night is a good thing. The radiator hose input line 1800 watt aftermarket heater we added to my wifes mushmobile gasser definitely cranked all 1800 watts into the water, circulated it, heated the block and provided instant heat/defrost after just 3 hours on a timer. If below zero is a regular thing then adding heated battery blankets is also a good idea. BTW - has anyone ever really wirn out a freeze plug factory block heater ?

Best Wishes all
MuddyPaws
 

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Copenhagen250r said:
Thanks Guys!


One more question:

How long does the heater need to be plugged in to be effective at say 30 degrees, and also at 0 degrees?


Thanks!
Hello:

If you are talking the Ford PSD freeze plug block heater - based on my last year in AK with a 95 Powerstroke (I think it is a 1,000 watt resistance coil embedded in a freeze plug) , three to four hours should be good to a little below 0 Farenheit. Regardless of Ford's claim you don't need to use the block heater till whatever - 20 F, 0 F - it definitely assures a faster start & warm up even in the mid 20s. Now when it gets cold, say 30 - 40 below F, all night is a good thing. The radiator hose input line 1800 watt aftermarket heater we added to my wife's mushmobile gasser definitely cranked all 1800 watts into the water, circulated it, heated the block and provided instant heat/defrost after just 3 hours on a timer. If much below zero is a regular thing then adding heated battery blankets is also a good idea. BTW - has anyone ever really worn out a freeze plug factory block heater ?

Best Wishes all
MuddyPaws
 

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A 15amp timer from harbor freight will pay for itself in one or two nights from just running 2-3 hours before you plan to leave.

Adrianspeeder
 

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i plug mine in when i turn the truck off at 1am and it stays plugged untill i leave for work the next day at 3, by leaving the block warm there is less heat and cool cycles of the motor and gaskets therefore should increase seal life, anyways back on yor question,
i bought a 1000watt heater from ebay and then found that my truck had a stocl one. i metered them out and the stock is 750 watt and if it gets down to about 15 degrees or less it still takes a while to warm up (driving) so i may put the 1k watt heater in to see if it helps cold (around 0 degrees) starts, so i guess it depends on what size heater you have.
 

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The only block heater failures I've seen were a result of corrosion, either from poor coolant maintanence or salt in the plug.

We have some trucks that stay plugged in for weeks at a time between uses, most of our 45 trucks run everyday, but we have extras, and drivers do go on vacation from time to time.

My only concern would be a short in the harness, I've seen a few PSD's go up in flames when left plugged in and unattended.
 

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Copenhagen250r said:
Up in falmes.....THAT"S NOT GOOD!!!!


What should I look from to make sure my truck doesn't go up ni flames?
Check the plug and the cord cracks in the insulation.
You can follow CSIPSD's advice too.:D
 

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Just make sure you do regular inspections of the truck harness (like while you're under there changing the oil) from the heater to the bumper. If you see any cracks or chaffing, replace the harness. Also, make sure you use the proper sized extension cord for the amperage, a small gauge extension cord will cause a voltage drop and excessive heat buildup in the cord and harness.

Most of the harness failures I've seen are at the bumper end, there's a lot of tugging and bending going on there so look at it carefully every time you plug it in. If it feels exceptionally limp right behind the plug you may have a problem.

After you plug it in, you might try giving it (the harness) a slight twist (where it goes into the back of the plug) to see if you can hear any crackling/popping. Often times the wires inside the harness right at the molded plug end will break without damaging the outer jacket. Then you have all the current trying to go through the few remaining strands of wire (the limpness) which causes a meltdown and fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sounds great.

I noticed there was some slight wear around the plug area, I'll just keep an eye on it.

Can I just just re-wire it if it get sto the point of being frayed and tattered?
 

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Heck, I have left my 99 pluged in for weeks at a time (while traviling on Business), and also used to plug it in everynight. Never had a problem with it going bad or not operating. The only thing that happend was I used it so much that the Male Plug end stated to fray and fall apart ( give me a little shock when I pluged it in wet LOL ), so I cilped it and put a new Industrial end on it, and it functioned fine for the rest of the trucks short life span. Heck, I bet if the salavge yard pluged it in right now it would still work LOL
 

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oh, and don't forget to unplug it BEFORE you drive away. :sofa
 
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