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We've been very cold the past 48 hours. Mostly below zero. I haven't driven the truck since Sunday. I filled up at a busy station, treated fuel with ARCHOIL and REVX winter additives to prepare for cold temps. Truck started this morning but wouldn't accelerate or run when I'm gear. I'm sure my filters are gelled. Will change and defrost them in the morning. Went out after work to add a little more additive and found the REVX bottle completely solid gel. ARCHOIL and Diesel 911 were both normal. No more REVX for me! Stay warm everyone. Levi
 

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We've been very cold the past 48 hours. Mostly below zero. I haven't driven the truck since Sunday. I filled up at a busy station, treated fuel with ARCHOIL and REVX winter additives to prepare for cold temps. Truck started this morning but wouldn't accelerate or run when I'm gear. I'm sure my filters are gelled. Will change and defrost them in the morning. Went out after work to add a little more additive and found the REVX bottle completely solid gel. ARCHOIL and Diesel 911 were both normal. No more REVX for me! Stay warm everyone. Levi
Website says keeps fuel stable to 0 deg. Their winter blend -45.

It's November and it's snowing. I thought global warming was supposed to warm things up. :roflol:
 

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It's been -7 to 6 as a high the past 48 hours. I don't think the air dog filters hanging down in the wind help, or that they are. Smaller micron filter. My shop said the REVX is a catalyst and by itself may gel. 40s are gonna feel warm next week.
 

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It's been -7 to 6 as a high the past 48 hours. I don't think the air dog filters hanging down in the wind help, or that they are. Smaller micron filter. My shop said the REVX is a catalyst and by itself may gel. 40s are gonna feel warm next week.
I think you need the winter version. The standard says year round in "warm" places. You and I don't qualify. The yoopers got almost 3 feet of snow we should see a few inches of lake effect. Still surrounded by corn and beans it's been a wet and wild fall.
 

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Im pretty sure its the winter stuff. Blue writing?
 
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I believe that 100% Stanadyne will also gel at/near freezing also. As stated earlier, it is the fuel / additive mixture that is stabilized. The way I think of it is that it is sort of like table salt. It is a solid by itself, but when mixed with water it lowers the water's freezing point.
 

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Turn to the right cable channel and they will say "You just don't realize how really cold it would be if it wasn't for global warming!". :happydance
 
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Problem with fuel in alot of cold climate zone areas of the country is, it's treated no.2 summer fuel yr round. This is true in my area too. How much it's treated with anti gel at the pump depends on the station and company, and they try to anticipate when to treat more and less. When a sudden cold snap like were experiencing comes around, it's usually a case of too little too late. And even when they do treat at max levels, usually 1000:1 compared to 1500:1, the treated no.2 summer fuel is only good between -5 and +5 degrees before total wax drop out occurs and can clog the filter, and the finer the filtration, like 2 micron, the easier it clogs.

I have found that most over the counter anti gels do very little to improve already treated no.2 summer fuels from the pump, but can be effective at treating untreated no.2 fuels down to around 0F if maximum dosed.

Just east of my location in Montana and North Dakota they offer no.1 fuels in various percentage mixtures at the pump. This is still the best and proven way to prevent fuel problems in the cold.

The best anti gel additive for winter I have come across is FPPF Polar Power or Total Power. The problem is these chemicals are mostly mineral turpentine and glycol ether, but are effective, and it only takes one time of being stuck in the cold from gelled fuel to wanting something effective in your fuel tank.

Bismic is correct when he said that the anti gel must be added before freezing temps into the fuel to work correctly. The only thing is though, all diesel fuels have different characteristics and depending on where the crude oil and refining processes came from, different anti gel formulations can have very little or very much effect on the types of fuel they are being used in.

I too have never seen the Archoil AR6200 freeze up at any temps, even though it's not an anti gel it stays liquid.

I really wish it was manditory for stations to post the fuel specs at the pump. Seems no one gives a hoot in the diesel fuel industry, at least in my area. And if you ask the station attendants, they never know anything but when to take a smoke break.

Harry
 

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Thanks for the information Harry. I've had this conversation for years on diesel fuel. Companies only treat down to temps for their area. It's why I treat my fuel all winter. I never know when I might need to go over to the east side of the state.

As for FPPF. I swore by their original product for years. It never failed me. And I was in some pretty drastic weather. But, FPPF is an emulsifier. It sends the water through the filters to the injectors. So, I don't use it in my 6.0L.
 

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My grampa always said the difference between #1 and #2 was kerosene was added to #1. any thoughts on that? little late to experiment this year, although it is snowing here today. kerosene is cheaper than anti-gel :)
 

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No.1 diesel and kerosene are basically the same, problem is no.1 kerosene is now ultra low sulfur to meet 2007' and newer diesel emission standards, which makes it more expensive to manufacture.

It also takes alot of kerosene to to make a difference depending on what degree of cold protection you need.

If you can find winterized fuel using no.1 diesel at the pump, it will usually be mixed 20/80, 50/50, 60/40, 80/20, 100%. Or some have 100% no.1 right next to the no.2 pump so you can mix yourself.

My region no longer has no.1 available anymore and it's all treated no.2 fuel in varying degrees depending on the time of year in cold season.

Most of the anti gel cold flow improvers added to no.2 fuel at station tanks will be good for around 0-F if treated properly, but sometimes it's not treated properly for the conditions and you get alot of gel issues occuring.

Another problem with all the newer diesels is the fuel filtration is a much finer micron rating which captures wax particles more easily and will clog up with wax quicker.

Best to treat your fuel well before hand of a cold snap if your not confident in the fuel your getting from a station in your region or are going to be traveling from a warm region to a cold region.

Harry
 
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