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Discussion Starter #1
1989 7.3 idi no turbo. F350 DRW SC. Newly rebuilt engine. I had a lot of oil in the water jacket because I screwed up the reassembly of the oil cooler by nicking an o ring. With the water jacket cleaned out, I bought Fleet Charge antifreeze. The bottle says meets or exdeeds the requirement of the following specifications:. . . . .tmc astm cummins cat, detroit, freightliner and goes on to list Navistar B1. The coolant is pink? I am used to ethylene glycol which is green. The question is: Should I put it in or get the green antifreeze and add the SCA myself. I do not know what the spec is for Navistar B1...can anyone clarify this for me?
 

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Use green only, with distilled water (or premixed) and add DCA yourself.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I will return the stuff I have and follow your advice. I know there have been a ton of posts on coolant. I guess the color means something? I have searched the pre 1994 forums looking for the discussions on coolant: no joy;(.
With that said, The pink coolant (Fleet Charge) says it is a low silicate, ehylene glycol based coolant precharged with nitrite (SCA) for cavitation protection. the label seems to indicate that is what I was looking for in my 7.3 non turbo idi engine. The truck (bought in 1989) owners manual is silent on the requirement for an SCA and the verbiage reads like what I would expect for a gasser. Anyway, thanks for the advice on the coolant, I will heed your advice and go with what fleet knowledge advises.
 

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http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/products/1272436

I hope this link works. It is a good article on the different colors of antifreeze. If you look at posts above, you will see that I was confused about the color, and why I should not use the pink antifreeze in my diesel engine. It is not only the engine that is affected, consider the effect on radiator and soldering within the radiator and heater. I learned a lot!
 

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First of all I would look up official information on DCA4, nowhere does it say protectant it is a coating, it builds up on every heated surface, restricting the flow of heat. It was the recommended coolant additive in Cats and Cummins. That is what I did engine repairs on class eights, we regularly replaced the water pump cover from corrosion. we regularly replaced cylinder heads because the injector tubes, Copper were eaten away we regularly, replaced Cat cylinder heads for cracking, from the DCA4 coating the valve area and eating away the Copper directional nozzles.
Ask any good Ford mechanic how many front covers they replace because of corrosion, how many oil coolers because of blockage from coolant drop out.
Go look at every Class eight, they have either Power-cool a Dex-cool, pen-cool , nal-cool product or Power-cool Plus a noat product. Those are the only coolant types you should ever use. The rest are crap.
I have seen the comparison of the different types of coolants inside an engine. I would not add green and DCA4 to my worst enemies engine.
Power-cool is what I use and I have test strips and if it needs a little more additive I just add it.
Google 7.3 engine front covers and oil coolers and read. I have not looked it up but if a part is not used a lot places like Rock Auto would not sell the part. I will go look.
 

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DCA and SCA are not the same product, meant to protect different cylinder wall metallurgies. DCA is for Cummins, International (Ford) and optional on CAT, SCA (NAL-Cool) was specified for DDA engines and optional on CAT.

DCA does not, in and of itself, cause ANY problems with the cooling system when used according to manufacturer's instructions. When you contaminate the coolant with multiple antifreeze and addatives types you get trouble, everyone says not to do this but it is done all the time. Also, thou shalt not use tap or well water, they are a major cause of scale formation, use distilled only or better yet premixed coolant.
 

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If you say DCA4 does not cause problems then you have never taken apart a lot of engines.
Water filters have sacrificial metals to counteract any acid build up. In B.C. our water is soft and I have personally never used premixed or distilled water. If it is not good enough to put in your engine why would you live there and drink it.
Adding different coolant additives does damage it, and can lead to additive drop out.
Cummins for years came with Dex-cool especially when they brought out the ISX's, people added different additives. all supplemental coolant additives, and the next greatest thing, that people are talked into buying and adding to there oil fuel or coolant. are always suspect.
I have seen the benifits and problems caused by improper coolant.
A good test is to go to a sales yard and look into the recovery tanks of different vehicles, look in your if there is crud visible, I have power-cool it is clean. it is 5 years old and 77.00 kilometers on it in my duramax, Dex-cool 300.000k in my Caprice, 220,000k in my 91 Nissan pick-up. All clean with original radiators.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is a very interesting discussion. Here is where I am. As I recall, when I bought my truck it had some sort of green antifreeze in it. It was first diesel and I knew nothing. In 1998 Ford publishe tsb 010198 warning of the possibility of cavitation in my engine. The resultant recall added a supplement to my coolant. When I changed the coolant I went to ford and bought another pint (ithink) of the additive. It has been a while now, and I don't remeber what it was. The information that I have been able to find about the coolant composition seems to indicate that what Ford was selling is essentiallly the same as DCA 4. I returned the pink Fleet Charge because of the color, based on the article I found at the link in a previous post, the danger of the pink antifreeze was more to the radiator solder joints than to the engine. I bought Peak Green, recommended for all vehicles prior to 2000. The lable does not list any type of silicates in the solution. I take that to mean ethylene glycol, with rust inhibitors, and a water pump lubricant. The engine front cover (back seal of the wp) was not pitted when I inspected it during the engine rebuild. Soooo......I have the green coolant, distilled water (the drinking water here is fairly soft and probably ok for radiator) but the distilled water (not filtered water) was only 60 cents a gallon so I got that. Now, ithought the DCA 4 was to coat the water jacket to inhibit cavitation. Is that the correct stuff, or should I be looking for something else for my 1989 na 7.3 idi engine in a pickup truck? Thanks.
 

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If you say DCA4 does not cause problems then you have never taken apart a lot of engines.
You are entitled to your OPINION, baseless and inaccurate as it may be.

Water filters have sacrificial metals to counteract any acid build up.
That is a broad claim, not all do and I would argue most do not.

In B.C. our water is soft and I have personally never used premixed or distilled water. If it is not good enough to put in your engine why would you live there and drink it.
Soft or hard is not the question, trace mineral and element content is. As long as the water meets SAFETY standards, it is considered potable, that does not mean it is non-reactive.

Adding different coolant additives does damage it, and can lead to additive drop out. Cummins for years came with Dex-cool especially when they brought out the ISX's, people added different additives. all supplemental coolant additives, and the next greatest thing, that people are talked into buying and adding to there oil fuel or coolant. are always suspect.
In a perfect or near perfect world, intermixing (cross contamination) does little HARM, in actuality drop out often cloggs the radiator passages resulting in overheating. Stick with what the OEM suggests.

I have seen the benifits and problems caused by improper coolant.
A good test is to go to a sales yard and look into the recovery tanks of different vehicles, look in your if there is crud visible, I have power-cool it is clean. it is 5 years old and 77.00 kilometers on it in my duramax, Dex-cool 300.000k in my Caprice, 220,000k in my 91 Nissan pick-up. All clean with original radiators.
Benefits from improper coolant? TONS of problems but no known benefits.

To the OP, you should run what it was born with, GREEN coolant and DCA-4 mixed with distilled water.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
To the OP, you should run what it was born with, GREEN coolant and DCA-4 mixed with distilled water.[/QUOTE]

John G: I have already puchased the green, and 5 gallons of distilled water. I have DCA 4 on hand with test strips. The two links that I posted earlier in the thread convinced me that that is the way to keep my engine and cooling system going. I have had this pickup since new and plan to keep it a while longer. The work I did helping folks in Alabama after the april 2011 tornadoes resulted in a fresh tranny overhaul. I just completed an engine rebuild, and the rest of the truck is in good condition. I may have this thing for another long time. Thanks to everyone for the input. Discussion benefits everybody that is looking for information on how to keep a piece of equipment opertional, and provides good information on which informed decisions can be made. Thanks again.:)
 
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