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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know why this would be? Is there anyone out there that would know how this would change the cooling architecture since the single turbo on the cab/chassis 6.7L's probably doesn't need to be liquid cooled.

I'm also guessing that the chassis cab's will have noticably less power.
 

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He got some of his info from the bowtie boys I bet..
 

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Here is the info I just got on them.

The F-450/550 chassis cabs and I belive the F-350 chassis cabs are using different turbo setups as well as different EGR valves. I know at least part of it has to do with emissions...

Description of Pickup Turbo...


• Single-sequential turbocharger


– Includes an industry-first double-sided compressor

wheel mounted on a single shaft by Honeywell

®

– Combines the advantages of a twin-turbocharged


system (fast throttle response) and a large
turbocharged system (ability to compress and force
air into the engine for more power) into one unit
– Provides up to 30 psi of boost
– Features a center-mounted pedestal design at
the rear of the engine to help improve NVH
characteristics and access for service

Description of Chassis Turbo...


• Single-stage turbocharger


– A compact and efficient variable-geometry design
helps deliver maximum power quickly
– Provides up to 30 psi of boost
– Features a center-mounted pedestal design at
the rear of the engine to help improve NVH
characteristics and access for service
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I bet it has something to do with Ford's warranty participation. In other words if one of the Honeywell's goes out it cost Ford x amount of $$$$ and if the sing state turbo goes out it cost x amount of $$$$$ and they know that guys driving trucks that aren't theirs and working them the hardest day in and day out on top of not caring about them are going to see more failed turbo's. So basically one turbo is for marketing and bragging rights and the other is to provide good power but save them $$$ in the long run with warranty claims... let's face it when ever ANY company does almost anything and you wonder why you can always revert back to one answer... "THE BOTTOM LINE $$$$$$"
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I bet it has something to do with Ford's warranty participation. In other words if one of the Honeywell's goes out it cost Ford x amount of $$$$ and if the sing state turbo goes out it cost x amount of $$$$$ and they know that guys driving trucks that aren't theirs and working them the hardest day in and day out on top of not caring about them are going to see more failed turbo's. So basically one turbo is for marketing and bragging rights and the other is to provide good power but save them $$$ in the long run with warranty claims... let's face it when ever ANY company does almost anything and you wonder why you can always revert back to one answer... "THE BOTTOM LINE $$$$$$"
He got some of his info from the bowtie boys I bet..
Rutcutter, I actually saw it on page 12 of this pdf: http://www.thedieselgarage.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=24650&d=1266505232
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I must be missing something. I don't see anything where it says the Chassis Cabs would run a different turbo than the pickups.
You're right, you're missing something... I have a 28" High Def computer monitor and see a lot of stuff that is normally hard to see or impossible to see with smaller monitors... I went to page twelve and blew up the bottom corner of the page and cropped it so you could see what I was talking about.

"To meet the needs of their unique commerical applications, Chassis Cab models feature a convential turbocharger design."



you guys are a tough crowd to please!
 
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
double post by accident... please delete
 

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The all-new 2-valve SOHC 6.2-liter gasoline V-8 is rated at 385 horsepower (at 5,500 rpm) and 405 pounds-feet of torque (at 4,500 rpm), and the all-new 4-valve OHV 6.7-liter Power Stroke V-8 turbodiesel is rated at 390 hp (at 2,800 rpm) and an earth-shaking 735 pounds-feet (at 1,600 rpm) in the F-250, F-350 and F-450 pickups. The F-450 and up chassis cabs are rated at 300 hp and 660 pounds-feet.
Let's put these powerful numbers in perspective.

For the gassers, the outgoing 2010 Super Duty's standard 5.4-liter gas V-8 is rated at 300 hp and 365 pounds-feet, and the optional 6.8-liter V-10 is rated at 362 hp and 457 pounds-feet. So the new 6.2-liter V-8 has more horsepower than either of the old engines and just misses splitting the difference in torque between the 5.4-liter and 6.8-liter, with two fewer cylinders than the massive 6.8-liter.

We can also compare the 6.2-liter V-8 in the Super Duty against its application in the 2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor. The 6.2-liter V-8 in the Raptor is rated at a larger 411 hp and 434 pounds-feet.

The power numbers are larger in the light-duty pickup for two reasons, according to Chris Brewer, Super Duty chief engineer. "The main reason is that when the truck goes over 8,500 pounds [gross vehicle weight rating], the SAE [horsepower and torque] rating method changes," Brewer said. "We can't get the same horsepower and torque out of it [like we can in the F-150].”

The 6.2-liter V-8 in the Super Duty also uses a different camshaft from the light-duty version, which, some may recall, is the same approach Ford uses to make 500 hp in the FR Raptor XT version of the 6.2-liter V-8.

Before we compare the old and new diesel power ratings, you may be wondering why there are two sets of power figures for the 6.7-liter diesel. Again, gross vehicle weight rating plays a role.

The Environmental Protection Agency requires different emissions testing procedures depending on the gross vehicle weight rating, which leads to different power ratings. So-called "heavy-duty light trucks" below 14,000 pounds GVWR are tested using a chassis dynamometer; medium-duty vehicles whose GVWR is 14,000 pounds or greater are tested using an engine dyno.

Comparing the oil burners, the old chassis-certified 6.4-liter Power Stroke diesel V-8 is rated at 350 hp and 650 pounds-feet, so we're seeing a substantial jump in power by 40 horses and 85 pounds-feet from Ford's in-house designed and built 6.7-liter V-8. The dyno-certified 6.4-liter is rated at 325 hp and 600 pounds-feet, or 25 hp more and 60 pounds-feet less than the 6.7-liter.

"We're real pleased about the numbers for the new gas and diesel engines," Brewer said. "It's a big win for customers and us."


With all of the power and pulling improvements, Ford hasn't left fuel economy out of the equation. "For the pickups, we'll see an 18 percent improvement in fuel economy and 25 percent in the chassis cabs," Brewer said.
 

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You're right, you're missing something... I have a 28" High Def computer monitor and see a lot of stuff that is normally hard to see or impossible to see with smaller monitors... I went to page twelve and blew up the bottom corner of the page and cropped it so you could see what I was talking about.

"To meet the needs of their unique commerical applications, Chassis Cab models feature a convential turbocharger design."



you guys are a tough crowd to please!
I see it now, that I am paying attention. :kick:haha
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm also guessing that the chassis cab's will have noticably less power.

Guess I called that one... 390 HP vs 300 HP & 735 ft-lbs vs 660 ft-lbs
 

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With the F-450 Puckup Ford probably sees most of the F-450/550 sales going to fleet use where fuel economy and efficiency rule supreme. It may help prevent the drivers of these vehicles from tearing them up. The down side are small business owners, landscapers, etc., who could respect the power will loose out. However the differences when combines with gearing, etc. may be minimal. Chris
 

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So much for ordering a F450 crew cab Lariat 4x4 cab-chassis and putting a bed on it.:gaah I was going to do that to get away from the sissy 450:haha
 

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I am assuming that the C&C model used the plain turbo since there are a lot of C&C trucks that use a PTO which requires a lot if idling. The VGT style has an attendency to gum up with soot from extended idling. The 7.3 never had any turbo issues from idling. Neither should the C&C 6.7s. The 300 hp should be plenty for most commercial applications. I believe this a smart move on Ford's part.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I am assuming that the C&C model used the plain turbo since there are a lot of C&C trucks that use a PTO which requires a lot if idling. The VGT style has an attendency to gum up with soot from extended idling. The 7.3 never had any turbo issues from idling. Neither should the C&C 6.7s. The 300 hp should be plenty for most commercial applications. I believe this a smart move on Ford's part.
The single turbo is a variable geometry.
 

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Guess I called that one... 390 HP vs 300 HP & 735 ft-lbs vs 660 ft-lbs
Well, yes and no....

As Mr. Brewer indicated in the quote of him above, the rating standard is different. Get 'em both on the same dyno on the same day stock with the same gearing and tires THEN we will have real data to chew on and I suspect the results will indicate less of a difference than the numbers suggest.

Let's not forget that the commercial (C&C) buyers want durability and reliability over peak power numbers because let's face it, generally they will be operated by an employee who doesn't care that much about the truck.
 

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Ford Motorhead
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The single turbo is a variable geometry.
Not on the cab & chassis models. Only the pickups have VGT. The pickups have 390hp/735tq. The cab and chassis has 300hp/660tq. I am sure the different turbo is the difference in the numbers along with a more conservative program to keep EGTs lower.
 
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