The Diesel Garage banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am going to add a cold air intake system, and am leaning towards the aFe with a dry filter (as I am sure the timely cleaning of an oiled filter will not get done due to the amount of miles I put on the pickup).

Thoughts anyone?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
What's wrong with the stock filter? Just playing devils advocate. My 6.0 has stock and all I did is open up the front via the "zoodad mod" by cutting holes to allow fresh air direct at the filter inlet. I did put a deflector in since I plow in the winter and don't want snow building up when she is sucking air. I guess I've never understood the need for an aftermarket filter system when the OEM spends alot of time developing the one already on the truck. A family member who turned wrenches and now workers for one of he big three would laugh anytime I mentioned KN filters. The only reason I ever did buy them for vehicles was if the paper Frams or Wix were expensive so it made sense to spend a little more and just wash it every 30k miles. My wife's last car there wasn't much difference in cost for 3-4changes so I threw a KN in it. Never felt the horsepower change or any fuel economy improvement they promote.

By the way my air temp is always same as ambient now with he zoodad and with 20lbs of boost there is about a 40 degree rise at the second air temp sensor after CAC. The 6.4 appears to have a similar air filter based on photos. I can't get any of the bibles to open for some reason and I'm not that familiar with he 6.4 but sucking air is sucking air right? :thumbsup. Hopefully this will help kick start the discussion when someone disagrees.

:sofa:

Wes
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have thought as you Weld Engineer, except, I have an H&S tuner and on tow mode with a brand new air filter if I get after it the air restriction indicator on the air filter will set and the "CHECK AIR FILTER" light comes on. If an aftermarket intake system will provide less restriction, then the engine will breathe easier, I won't have to reset the air filter restriction indicator, and perhaps there will be some minor improvement to MPG.
 

·
Aimless Wanderer
Joined
·
929 Posts
this is your take over the topic and how much good it is going to brought back in the case of the trouble posted at the very top is yet to see as i also need to mend with the same ..
Please clarify as my lower level of intelligence was unable to process the information you have presented.:confused:
 

·
Aimless Wanderer
Joined
·
929 Posts
I like a cold air intake myself; preferably a hood scoop mounted either off center on the hood panel, or side mounted on a/or fender(s) type affair for the "ram air" effect. I seen a really nice setup on a guys F-350 using fiberglass scoops mounted on the sides where the intake screens are. There were insulated aluminum pipes fashioned to feed the airbox underhood also. Pretty neat looking setup that looked very functional. One feature I really liked was an underhood actuator door for blocking outside air and allowing underhood air intake. I imagine this is a good idea for precluding snow ingestion.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
Every time I have ever seen engine failures from a filter allowing dirt threw the filter or the intake coming apart has been an aftermarket system.
There is a filter test results are that the aftermarket allow dirt into the system KNN is 89 % efficient a stock filter is 99+% efficient, look it up, filling an engine with dirt so you can hear the turbo noise to me is less than intellectual. Not one system has a guarantee, not one system proves it does anything. a very small film of dirt in a system causes a lot of restriction, anybody that ever had an oil bath air filter learns that well a little dirt in the intake and wearing the turbo, and in the CAC is a restriction.
Stock comes with a guarantee, no other system does.
Just a thought from someone who does not believe the BS about intakes, additives, EGT's. I worked on engines all my life that pull their guts out every day, with stock guaranteed systems.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weld engineer

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
I have thought as you Weld Engineer, except, I have an H&S tuner and on tow mode with a brand new air filter if I get after it the air restriction indicator on the air filter will set and the "CHECK AIR FILTER" light comes on. If an aftermarket intake system will provide less restriction, then the engine will breathe easier, I won't have to reset the air filter restriction indicator, and perhaps there will be some minor improvement to MPG.
Is that a stock OEM filter? I don't doubt that your pulling some serious flow but wonder if the sensor is bad or their is something else going on. How much boost do you build? I'm not tuned much but my 6.0 doesn't even register on the vacuum sensor for the filter and it will spool to 26 lbs fast. It's kinda oranges and apples but your 6.4 liter displacement and combined boost I would think the volume is like 8-9 liters with full boost- just a WAG so if someone knows for sure please correct me. I guess my thought is unless your running a lot higher boost pressure than stock then the volume shouldn't be that much different. Tuning affects timing, fueling and speed of boost from what I understand. Volume is volume in and out of the engine. I suppose if the RPMs increase faster than stock then the rate of flow would be different. I guess my concern would be along the lines of what John is saying that flow is increased in aftermarket because it doesn't filter as much allowing more air flow. Is there a way to increase flow/ reduce restriction AND still use stock filters is the question.

:popcorn:beerdrink:beerdrink

Wes
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Is that a stock OEM filter? I don't doubt that your pulling some serious flow but wonder if the sensor is bad or their is something else going on. How much boost do you build? I'm not tuned much but my 6.0 doesn't even register on the vacuum sensor for the filter and it will spool to 26 lbs fast. It's kinda oranges and apples but your 6.4 liter displacement and combined boost I would think the volume is like 8-9 liters with full boost- just a WAG so if someone knows for sure please correct me. I guess my thought is unless your running a lot higher boost pressure than stock then the volume shouldn't be that much different. Tuning affects timing, fueling and speed of boost from what I understand. Volume is volume in and out of the engine. I suppose if the RPMs increase faster than stock then the rate of flow would be different. I guess my concern would be along the lines of what John is saying that flow is increased in aftermarket because it doesn't filter as much allowing more air flow. Is there a way to increase flow/ reduce restriction AND still use stock filters is the question.

:popcorn:beerdrink:beerdrink

Wes
Yes Wes, usually a Wix, but this happens on all the stock filters. It will get to the high 30's on boost. If one were diligent the oil treatment filters would likely out-perform stock filters in both restriction and filtration, but we put miles on too fast in too dirty of environments to take the risk. If I could get a comparable dry filter in regard to filtration, even though I may need to change it frequently, I would be interested.

I am not interested in this for the heavy footed - let's see how fast I can get to the next stop light aspect, but rather for efficiency and longevity, as we haul up to 30,000 lbs. gross with this pickup/trailer. We legally can haul more if we licensed for more, but accept for occasional short trips on flat land - which we rarely do - I don't feel comfortable pulling more than that from a safety and wear and tear standpoint.

I am in construction, and will not risk dusting the engine if I cannot be convinced that the filtration is as good or better than stock. However, stock didn't account for the air flow that mine evidently would like to have now. Stock DID provide 4 mpg less mileage than I now get with modifications, and I have record of every fuel up since it was new that gets input into excel for cost per mile calculations. I am not at all impressed with what the engine manufactures are required to conjur up in order to meet current emission standards.

But I digress, you, JohnP, and I have had this dialogue before as I recall.

I really just wanted recommendations and experience with aftermarket air intake systems. The size of the air filters relative to horsepower produced in this pick up compared to the heavy equipment that we run pales in comparison. If I could figure out how to get a primary and secondary air filter off of say a 330 excavator under the hood I would do it in a heartbeat.

Regarding egt's John, I ran the same engine at the same horsepower in a T600 and a 378. The T 600 had one small filter under the hood - the 378 had two large ones mounted outside. The egt difference was typically about 200 degrees different on the same hill, with the same load, and the same outside temperature. That is proof enough for me.

P.S. aFe advertises 99.4% with dry and 99.7% with oiled. It would be good to see an independent test on a variety of brands. And yes, during the Mt. St. Helens ash that we drove in, those that had oil bath filters faired much better.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
Engines in B.C. have the highest warrenty claims of any region, we have mountains. engines that can last for a million miles without problems last 1/2 that time in B.C. We find the problems, earlier than any other region, having an engine continually going threw thermal shocks of full power to full jakes continually find problems, but it also finds the cures.
On EGT's with a different air cleaner, the heat in the turbo is what drives the turbine so the lower EGT gives you less boost. There is an effect called the Wilson effect, that is when you add any extra air into the cylinder that is not needed for combustion you loose, it takes power to compress the air that is not needed. That is called friction HP, the energy it takes to spin the engine over. Caterpillar uses intake valve actuators to take advantage of this effect, lowering the compression when not needed.
I use to dyno trucks, Ford, and KW had cabovers that when you jacked up the cab opened the intake and exhaust, no muffler or air cleaner in the system we use to dyno units with the cab up many times checking the fact the junk fan Ford used did not work, there was not an increase in HP when the cab was raised or down. This is not the BS hp readings that are used, where they rev the unit to max RPM then dump the load on it and brag about what they get, these are 20 minute full power pulls. Then lower the power say 5% and put on full throttle and the engine must pull it back up to the max HP.
Most units that run outside air filters have long plastic piping, with lots of turns and elbows, all restrictions, the single air filter, under the hood getting its air from in front of the windshield, Takes advantage of the preasure created in front of the windshield, Just like Nascar does.
If these fancy air cleaners and exhaust work so well, put them on a dyno for 5 minutes then change them out and do it again and prove it.
The air cleaner test is on this site, I even printed it out, It is headlined
ISO 5011 Duramax air filter test report, Look it up, read it, and then make an informed decision. I was wrong about the KNN it was better than I remembered.
Just a thought!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oxbow12

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
I have thought as you Weld Engineer, except, I have an H&S tuner and on tow mode with a brand new air filter if I get after it the air restriction indicator on the air filter will set and the "CHECK AIR FILTER" light comes on. If an aftermarket intake system will provide less restriction, then the engine will breathe easier, I won't have to reset the air filter restriction indicator, and perhaps there will be some minor improvement to MPG.
H&S offers cold intakes I guess my opinion which is worth - well nothing really- is go with them since your trusting your engine to their tuner. Doesn't look like they offer a dry filter though so I'd contact them and make a decision based on that what they say and what they will do if the issue keeps occurring or you dust a turbo. Didn't mean to turn it into a debate. I did a lot of searches last night and it looks to be pretty common issue. There was a stock filter that is a blue core which was supposed to perform better. I'd say your doing your due diligence to do some research and make an informed decision. Many guys from the searches have just disabled the filter minder because it sets at a pretty low level of vacuum. Good luck.

Wes
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oxbow12

·
Aimless Wanderer
Joined
·
929 Posts
In all the hopped up light duty trucks I've seen running around, don't think I've ever seen a gauge calibrated in inches of water column ever mounted where the driver can see it. The common name for these is a filter restriction gauge, or more properly a manometer. I have three older large trucks and they have "Donaldson" gauges and you can visually tell when it is time to service the filter elements by the deflection of the needle. Get into a hard pull requiring a lot of boost and the restriction reading goes higher even with a new element. One of these mounted in a gauge pod say on the "A" pillar of the driver's side would be a handy thing to have. I see a lot of gauges there, but never a manometer.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
In all the hopped up light duty trucks I've seen running around, don't think I've ever seen a gauge calibrated in inches of water column ever mounted where the driver can see it. The common name for these is a filter restriction gauge, or more properly a manometer. I have three older large trucks and they have "Donaldson" gauges and you can visually tell when it is time to service the filter elements by the deflection of the needle. Get into a hard pull requiring a lot of boost and the restriction reading goes higher even with a new element. One of these mounted in a gauge pod say on the "A" pillar of the driver's side would be a handy thing to have. I see a lot of gauges there, but never a manometer.
I have one in my 89 Pete, and should put one in the pickup as well.

Wes, I have looked at the H&S as well, and have not ruled that out.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
I have a restriction guage on my Duramax, it is under the hood but is graduated and locks at the highest reading.
I would like to see someone remove the filter and clean the housing vacuum and spray wash it then assemble it and run for 2 minutes, full pull, with the filter then remove the filter and do anouther run, full pull.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Engines in B.C. have the highest warrenty claims of any region, we have mountains. engines that can last for a million miles without problems last 1/2 that time in B.C. We find the problems, earlier than any other region, having an engine continually going threw thermal shocks of full power to full jakes continually find problems, but it also finds the cures.

I fully understand the conditions that British Columbia has to offer, but BC is not the only Province/State with mountains. I suspect pulling a 135,000lb. load from Phoenix to Flagstaff @ 115F ambient temperature is at least as demanding.

On EGT's with a different air cleaner, the heat in the turbo is what drives the turbine so the lower EGT gives you less boost. There is an effect called the Wilson effect, that is when you add any extra air into the cylinder that is not needed for combustion you loose, it takes power to compress the air that is not needed. That is called friction HP, the energy it takes to spin the engine over. Caterpillar uses intake valve actuators to take advantage of this effect, lowering the compression when not needed.
I use to dyno trucks, Ford, and KW had cabovers that when you jacked up the cab opened the intake and exhaust, no muffler or air cleaner in the system we use to dyno units with the cab up many times checking the fact the junk fan Ford used did not work, there was not an increase in HP when the cab was raised or down. This is not the BS hp readings that are used, where they rev the unit to max RPM then dump the load on it and brag about what they get, these are 20 minute full power pulls. Then lower the power say 5% and put on full throttle and the engine must pull it back up to the max HP.

I am not interested in injecting more air than the engine can use, I just want the engine to get all the air it needs.

Most units that run outside air filters have long plastic piping, with lots of turns and elbows, all restrictions, the single air filter, under the hood getting its air from in front of the windshield, Takes advantage of the preasure created in front of the windshield, Just like Nascar does.

I suspect that Peterbilt and Kenworth would not put externally mounted air filters on their conventional tractors if it diminished performance and efficiency.

If these fancy air cleaners and exhaust work so well, put them on a dyno for 5 minutes then change them out and do it again and prove it. The air cleaner test is on this site, I even printed it out, It is headlined
ISO 5011 Duramax air filter test report, Look it up, read it, and then make an informed decision. I was wrong about the KNN it was better than I remembered.

Thank you, I'll look at it.

Just a thought!
Thanks John.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Ok, I looked at the test that John referred to, and found an interesting dissemination, both for and against, the use of aftermarket air intake systems. Here it is borrowed from another forum - I have seperated the commentary by color to make it easier to follow:

Mark,

I keep trying to get your input of this post but I keep missing you. This post is not adversarial but I do raise some issues that should be faced head on.

I agree that the HP increase with an aftermarket intake is mininal and I base that on all the dyno tests power adder manufacturers conducted a couple years go. They found little if any change in HP at all when they were dyno testing, regardless of the intake--which included testing with no intake at all. At that time they were routinely seeing 400-440RWHP. I would imagine at power levels in excess of 450-500 RWHP an intake may indeed be needed, but that is just a hunch.
As I have said hundreds of times the intakes should NOT be pruchased for HP gians as it is small at best. The worst way to dyno an engine is with no intake as well, in most cases you'll get less HP than with a stock filtrations system. The AFE uses velocity stack designs and others don't and it makes small differences in HP.

I think the vast majority of EGT reduction an aftermarket intake provides is due to sealing off the hot underhood engine air. I just recently pulled of my Edge Attitude, but for a couple months I ran it with intake air temp displayed. There seems to be a direct correlation between air intake temp and EGT. I installed a Tex Christopher CAI (cold air intake kit) on my stock airbox in order to seal out hot underhood air, and the cold air kit keep the EGTs lower during "city" driving. However, there is little difference in EGTs with my LB7 at freeway speeds with the intake sealed vs unsealed.

The lower EGT's you get are due to adding MORE air volume AKA CFM, you add fuel you need to add air to get complete combustion and to utilize the BTU function of the fuel. Otherwise no one would ever buy a supercharger, turbo, nitrous or other oxygen adding devices. Lower air temps make a difference but very small and is so variable due to ambient temps at any one point in time.
I am not convinced there is a real difference in turbo spool-up time with an aftermarket intake. The first thing I did when I bought my truck was to install a K&N Aircharger. The Air Charger seals off the hot underhood air. The first thing I noticed was a lot more turbo noise, and the reason for the increase in noise was most likely due to the removal the the factory resonator.

Most all customers report quicker spool up time, easy to see and feel even without gauges. Most report an increase in boost pressures at max and partial throttle.

I agree that an aftermarket intake certainly feels like it is giving better throttle response, but I am sure much (if not all) of that impression comes from the increase in turbo noise. I drag raced for 9 years, and one thing I learned was "seat of the pants" impressions are not a reliable indcator of actual performance. I think the noisy turbo feeds the impression that the vehicle has better throttle response, but I have not yet seen any empirical measuremnt that shows one way or the other.

Your comment that it certainly feels like it has better throttle response is what is showing a better spool up on the turbo as well. Only you can decide if you are capable of feeling or just hearing the difference in throttle response. All I can tell you is I have installed systems on every truck I have ever had and seen higher boost pressures, and better spool up.

I don't know how you could measure throttle response. You can't use 60' times at the dragstrip, because for a dragstrip launch you stall the engine against the convertor to get the turbo spooled up. You could try to launch from idle, but I'm not sure that would show anything either.

60 foot times on a 8000 LB street truck will be very hard to prove even if you added 30-40 HP, look at the weight ratio to HP amount.
We also have to be careful about using mpg gains to evaluate a new intake. These engines take 18-20K to break-in, and my mileage constantly improved during that time and I already had the Air Charger on. When I learned of the oiled cotton-gauze air filters propensity to let grit into the engine, I changed to an Amsoil (oiled foam) in a swiss-cheesed factory air-box. There was no diffference in mileage though turbo noise was reduced. I also didn't "feel" a change in throttle response, though feeling sin't worth much.

Newer diesels break in way before 18-20K, go back to the old 7.3 or even earlier yes, but crosshatch depth and ring desings aren't like that today. 5-10K at most. Your MPG improved because you worn off the new feeling of putting the pedal down to feel the fun of 8000 LBS accelerating after 5 K break in miles most likely. A foam filter used to be the standard as far as stopping dirt in an aftermarket product, but the patented PG7 way out flows it clean or dirty as evidenced by the test and the foam clogs way faster too. If your turbo noise was reduced then you also had a reduction in flow. Slow moving streams are quiet, while fast moving ones make noise, air is the same way.
When I saw the air filter test (http://www.duramax-diesel.com/spicer/index.htm) and learned that aftermarket air filters flowed nowhere near double the stock paper AC Delco filter (as K&N has clainmed), learned the Delco filters better, holds more dirt, and plugs up 2.5 to 3 times slower than the K&N, Amsoil, and AFE--meaning that the Delco only flows less when all the filters are new--I changed to the stock Delco paper filter. I saw no change in mileage.

No one can quantify your MPG, so many variables, summer or winter, clean filters (fuel) or not, driving style or towing more or less. Broken in engine or not. Used up the "new feeling" as I mentioned earlier etc etc. What are your methods of MPG calculation and how to you guarantee the results are correct each and every time?? Again so many variables. The AC was 99.93% efficient, the AFE PG7 was 99.23%. That is 1/2 of 1% difference (0.5%)when clean, by my views that is next to nothing and not worth worrying about. The AFE PG7 flowed 4.99 while the AC was 6.23 a difference of 19.9% in favor of the PG7. The AC held 574 grams while the PG7 held 233 till each one reached 10 inches of water, while that is in favor of the AC if you're not into doing maintenance the PG7 still flowed 19.9% better when it was clean and I suspect it flowed more as well up to a specific point as it got dirty, then at that 10 inches of water it still flowed at the same level of the AC. Plus remember the PG7 still didn't let the dirt thru even when loaded with 233 and at 10 inches of water, this is VERY important. We are all into performance or we woudln't be doing this for a living or hobby so cleaning a filter more often to get nearly 20% more flow is worth it to me and others I suspect. Dirt passing was 0.4 for the AC while the PG7 was 1.4, but the Baldwin (it is a comparable quality paper filter) passed 1.1. Why I do not know, but in any case the 1.4 difference is still very very small and in the life of an engine not much to worry about.

I am now running a 500 RWHP race tune on my truck. I may actually be able to use a better flowing intake, but I still haven't seen any tests that conclusively show ANY aftermarket intake flows better. It makes sense to me that they should flow better, but I have not seen the kind of test that would conclusively settle the issue. Regardless, I won't run anything that doesn't filter as well as a stock filter because I am sure mileage and power will really take a nose dive if excess dirt gets into the engine and causes premature wear.

This is something I can't help you on, you have to make the decision if it is worth it to you as a individual. I can tell you they do flow more, per the AFE tests on their own in house flow bench. Could they be fudging yes, do they, not in my opinion. I have been out to there factory and they are as honest as any manufacturer I have seen in my 20+ years in the aftermarket industry.

Now the AFE filtered better than any of the other aftermarket filters tested, but it still passed over four times as much dirt in less than half the time vs the Delco. Maybe that it not a significant difference, and maybe under normal driving conditions it doesn't make any difference at all. Oil analysis from trucks with aftermarket filters--even with the poor filtering K&N--driven in normal conditions showed acceptable silicone levels.

See above concerning dirt and levels of restriction info.

The AFE also plugged over twice as quickly as the Delco. The only advantage to the AFE was in it's flow when new. It flowed 20% better, but the only way to keep it at the 20% higher flow rate would be to clean the AFE very frequently. How frequently is hard to say, but if a Delco filter would run 6,000 miles before reaching "dirt saturation", then the AFE would need to be cleaned every 2,400 miles. Perhaps the 20% flow advantage of the AFE lasts for 20% of it's "dirt saturation" level, meaning the AFE would need to be cleaned every 480 miles to maintain it's flow advantage. All that is just a guess.

See above info on maintenance intervals and such.

I admit the AFE seems to be the best of the aftermarket air filters evaluated in the test and htere may be an advantage to the AFE system for high HP trucks if the filter is kept clean.

I totally agree.

However, I cannot see any emprical evidence indicating that anything other than a Delco paper filter in a factory airbox--sealed with a cold-air kit if needed--has any advantage for guys who are running under 400-450 RWHP. That would be the vast majority of DMAX owners.

I feel the lower EGT and quicker spool up and higher air availability is well worth it to mildly modded truck owners and they get better BTU efficiency for the fuel used. Plus if you're doing dyno or competition these guys basically could care less about EGT's or dirt, they are after the biggest numbers or the longest pull. More air flow will not make much more HP as I have said before, but it will for the "normal" user lower EGT's, spool up faster and potentially provide more MPG. Combine an intake and exhaust and there are a lot of members here that have seen MPG increases from nothing but increased air flow thru the engine to raise it's efficiency level.

Now I am very open to empricial evidence showing otherwise. I would buy an AFE intake system if it had been tested to show it filters at least as well as the Delco paper filter and maintains it's 20% flow advantage over it's " dirt saturation" life.

You'll have to get with Spicer and see if he is willing to do a re-test and get the point/number where the amount of flow decreases vs the extra dirt added to decrease it. I think you'll find the AFE PG7 will have a higher flow somewhere in the 80-90% range, then when the extra 10-20% of dirt is added to hit 10 inches of water you would be in the negative flow level as compared to the AC filter. This is where extra maintenance will come in and you'll have to make a decision if you're willing to clean more often or not and just use a throw away paper filter. Again the key here is the AFE PG 7 stopped the dirt whiel otherss let dirt thru earlier and more quantity as well.

Keep in mind too that we are comparing a stock sized drop in filter to a same sized AFE PG7. If you install a Stage II system with a much larger filter that has a lot more square inches of filter media than a stock drop in the flow rates increase and the time to dirty when they slow down increases a lot too! We sell a lot of drop in filters, but if you're looking for an EGT drop, spool up increase, and CFM advantage then the Stage I and II are the ones that really make a difference. Spicer's test was a test to see which filters passed dirt as compared to a stock filter, not which intakes system flowed the most air. This is something the membership tends to forget when they are looking at this well documented info that Testand Corp. and Spicer did. When you compare a drop in filter to a intake system the whole deal is off except which filters let thru dirt and which ones don't.
Hope this helps, and remember this is my opinion backed up by Spicer's independent test info. I have a 10,000 dollar engine in my truck too, that I use this info on to decide if it is worth it to me, I choose yes and have the same potential for problems as the rest of the membership. I am not made of money so I will NOT do something to my engine that will cause me a large expense for the benefit of a more air either.

The most important information that I gleaned from this discussion is that in comparing OEM filters to aftermarket of the same size, the OEM is the way to go. However, there are advantages to increasing the design/size of the filter if one has increased the demand for air (as I have) by adding modifications such as tuning, exhaust, etc.

Oil analysis would probably be the best way to moniter silicone intake regardless the filter.

I would like to find an OEM type filter design that has larger capacity, so perhaps AFE's dry filter in a stage II configuration is the answer. More research to do....
 

·
Aimless Wanderer
Joined
·
929 Posts
I think the best way to increase the life of an air filter is to place an air spinner before the primary air filter. Maradyne http://www.turboprecleaner.com/ makes some fine ones used on most off road equipment out there. If a guy were to fit one of these in the airstream of their intake a good portion of the particulate ingested though the spinner never reaches the filter.

I'd like to have something like their "Power RAM", (I have two on trucks) slightly downsized and protruding through the hood panel off to the side of center covered by a small hood scoop. These things do work quite well from my experience but I've always ran stock Donaldson elements.

While this may, or may not be on the proper track of efficient air filtration and upgraded performance, with the cost of filter elements it's best to look at the whole picture and cost of operation. Something like this is a great addition to the total package whether it be light, or heavy duty operation in any kind of environment.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I looked at the applications for the pre-cleaners, but I just don't have extra room under the hood. They might work on an in-line like Cummins though.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top