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Discussion Starter #1
well every now and then I notice I get junk fuel milage for 1 or two tanks then it is good again.. today I put two and two togeather and realized this is when it gets real cold outside.

my theory is that the engine cannot stay warm enough to have the egpv stay open. Does anyone know what peramiters the EGVP uses for its control?

and for people using them, do grill covers work good and what is the max temp you can use them in?

I find the truck warms up way to slow compared to my old f150.

Steve
 

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The EBP valve is closed with throttle below like 20%, and engine speed less than 1400 RPM. Engine coolant needs to be below 140*F as well.

Now, different PCM programming versions have different values for these numbers, so they are a ROUGH GUIDE and nothing more.

So, no matter what, the EBP valve will NOT close while you are driving down the road, it is basically only active at low engine speed + low throttle position + coolant temp., if any one of those increases, it is OPEN.

You WILL lost economy due to denser air, stiff tires and lubes, plus #1 diesel has less energy than #2, so when the percentage of #1 increases (as it must or you gel-up), you lose some power and economy.
 

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i thought it was based on RPM and oil temp?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
John_G said:
The EBP valve is closed with throttle below like 20%, and engine speed less than 1400 RPM. Engine coolant needs to be below 140*F as well.

Now, different PCM programming versions have different values for these numbers, so they are a ROUGH GUIDE and nothing more.

So, no matter what, the EBP valve will NOT close while you are driving down the road, it is basically only active at low engine speed + low throttle position + coolant temp., if any one of those increases, it is OPEN.

You WILL lost economy due to denser air, stiff tires and lubes, plus #1 diesel has less energy than #2, so when the percentage of #1 increases (as it must or you gel-up), you lose some power and economy.
dense air will give you better fuel mileage. our cold weather here isn't enuf to real freeze up anything, we are having a cold snap right now and it is -8c at night and about 0 during the day (32f)

sense most of my driving is city driving back and forth to work, the trip is about 10 miles and I can actually hear when it is closed so i know when it is closed and when it is open as the engine sound changes.

I wonder if all of the parameters you mentioned have to be met before it will open instead of just one. Or at least the coolant temp and throttle position. I could see me being under 140 and less then 20% quite often.

Steve
 

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Nope, dense air increase DRAG more than it increase burn efficiency, but I see where you are comming from.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
John_G said:
Nope, dense air increase DRAG more than it increase burn efficiency, but I see where you are comming from.
ok I understand when you are looking at it as wind resistance. but we are talking 30mph speeds and not every tank only every 3rd or 4th, when the temp drops from say 40 degree to 33 degrees so I wouldent thing that would make any difference from air density. I guess realy the only way to know would be for me to buy a winter cover and try it.. but at what seasonal temp should I remove the grill cover?

Steve
 

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Your thermostat may not be working correctly. I am going to put in a 203* thermostat from dieselsite.com in my truck when I get a chance.

The 94 and 95's had a 203* but was changed to 190* on 96 and up along with a water pump change so you cant just buy one for a 95 truck and put it in.
 

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I had a 95 and went to napa and got a 215 thermostat and it worked great.It was still in the truck when I traded it in. The temp run about middle of normal and I got better fuel mileage.
 

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hmmm i wonder if it will help me get better? i get about 17.9 now (25-40 degrees) and around 19 in summer, but ever since i bought my truck the dash gage only gets to the n or maybe the O but thats as far as it has ever made it even in the hot summer
 

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winter fuel is going to give u worse mileage. and obviously if u let ur truck sit to warm up anymore then u do in the summer that will have an affect on it to.
 

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Idle time adds up, I belive one hour of idle time equals to about 33 miles of driving.

Winter bled fuel like was already said maybe the problem too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Logan said:
Idle time adds up, I belive one hour of idle time equals to about 33 miles of driving.

Winter bled fuel like was already said maybe the problem too.
I thought there was a thread I read where our trucks burn very little at idle?

Steve
 

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Stircrazy said:
I thought there was a thread I read where our trucks burn very little at idle?

Steve
I thought I remembered that too.

A couple of things that haven't been posted yet. I've found the magic temp (ambient air) where the ebpv starts closing is 40 F (8 C). I've also found that the warmer the combustion air & the warmer the coolant (on the higher end of normal opp range), the better my mileage will be.
 

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To go back to the denser air idea... Denser air means more power right?? Isn't that the idea behind the turbo, to make the air denser??? And if one is able to stay out of the "crazy-high" RPM's as a result of having more power down low (Just use all the low instead of highs), wouldn't that person get better milage???

I will admit though that I do not know very much about diesel engines, I do want to learn though!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
99StrokerDude said:
To go back to the denser air idea... Denser air means more power right?? Isn't that the idea behind the turbo, to make the air denser??? And if one is able to stay out of the "crazy-high" RPM's as a result of having more power down low (Just use all the low instead of highs), wouldn't that person get better milage???

I will admit though that I do not know very much about diesel engines, I do want to learn though!
yes more denser air will make more power, and if you cool that aire it will get even more dense. what he was talking about was the effect air density has on drag, which is not a factor as it is a very small amount and nothing that would affect milage.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #16
BigGreen said:
A couple of things that haven't been posted yet. I've found the magic temp (ambient air) where the ebpv starts closing is 40 F (8 C).
this is interesting as i am finding I am fine at 8 C or even 5C but lower than that is when I notice the mileage drop. about 50 miles/3/4 of a tank. some of it will be due to idling but I only idle 10 min in the am to defrost the windows. what I read before is we only burn .3 of a gal per hour at idle.. whether this is right I don't know.

Steve
 

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Just a couple of things. First of all I have owned fords all my life and love ford but, No matter what, you cant go by where the needle is in the gauge. If it is in the Normal area than it is just that normal. Not; at the "o" is about 145*, at the "r" is about 160*..... It dont work that way. If the temp is, lets just say, anywhere between 145* and 220* then it goes to the preselected spot on your gauge. Trans temp, voltage, and Oil Pressure are all this way in fords and have been for a long time. I dont know why Ford had such brilliant engineering on that.

Secondly, I do have the Lund Plastic Snap-In winter front on my truck with a 203* thermostat and it helps. The thermostat, not as much. But with the winterfront i do notice that it warms up faster and stays warm when you get into city driving instead of cooling off once you get off the interstate like it did without the winterfront. With my truck, it has to get up to about 50 to 60* outside before i worry about taking the plastic chunks out of the grill. Even then im not sure how warm the coolant is actually getting, of course, because of the wonderful NOT ACCURATE ford gauges.

PS, Im not sure if this is accurate, but i have heard that "Cold Air and Cold Fuel = Performance, Warm Air and Warm Fuel = mileage"
 

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i think the ideal temperature of diesel fuel for combustion is like around 70-75*F. i dont see that ever happening because the heads get so hot even in the winter.
 
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