The Diesel Garage banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
TDG Official Poo Flinger
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've seen alot of people asking about trailer tires over the years, load ratings, best tire, etc, etc, etc.


Here's some of the info I've compiled, and a awesome supplier.

www.easternmarine.com have load ranges all the way up to "H" 6,005lbs.

Here's a link to some normal size, heavy load tires.


When considering a trailer tire, here are a few important things to look at.

TIRE CONSTRUCTION TYPE - Bias Ply vs. Radial
TIRE APPLICATION TYPE - (ST) Special Trailer vs. (LT) Trailer
TIRE SIZE - % of section height / section width Refereed to as 'Aspect Ratio'
TIRE LOAD RANGE - Load carrying capacity and air pressure rating

::::NOTES:::

Inflation

Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.

Load Capacity:

The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight(GVWR) by 20 percent.


Speed

All "ST" & "LT" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.


Time

In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone.
Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire.
It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Mileage
Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles.

These 'Special Trailer' (ST) tires have been constructed for better high speed durability and bruise resistance under heavy loads. Trailer tire construction varies substantially from automotive tires, therefore it is essential to choose the correct tire for your towing application. In general, trailer tires have the same load range (or ply) from bead to bead and are bias ply construction. This allows for a stiffer side wall which provides safer towing by helping to reduce trailer sway problems.The use of (LT) tires offer a wide range of specialized trailer tires for heavy loads on average sized wheels. LT doesn't not mean "light truck".

The use of 'Passenger Car' (P) is not recommended for towing because their construction, they normally do not have the sidewall plys, or weight rating sufficient for trailering,...usually radial or bias belted, allows for more flexible side walls. Using a "P" tire could lead to increased trailer sway and loss of control.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
683 Posts
Thanks, Tank.:thumbsup
 

·
TDG Official Poo Flinger
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is why I needed to find stronger trailer tires......this happened last week, for the second time on my Government welding trailer,...and the reason I did some tire research....







.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
17 Posts
Speed

All "ST" & "LT" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.
Thank you for posting this information. You have some really useful points. One point that you might modify or check into is the comment about all LT tires have a maximum speed rating of 65. That is not entirely accurate. Goodyear LT tires do not have a speed rating and that is one of the advantages over their ST tires.

http://www.goodyear.ca/tire_school/tirespecs.html

I realize that this doesn't mean that you can safely tow at crazy speeds, but there is not the 65 mph limitation like their ST tires.
 

·
& amp; amp; amp; amp;
Joined
·
372 Posts
Thanks for the info. I have tri axle trailer with 16" wheels trailer is rated at 14k, what would be wrong with adding a light truck, or commercial truck tire to it with a load of E? The tire would support the weight with no problems, wouldn't this be better for extended highway use at 65-70mph, and probably last to 5 years?
 

·
TDG Official Poo Flinger
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
trailer tires have stiffer sidewalls...so the trailer doesn't sway uncontrollably...

and tires on a trailer should be changed out every 2-3 years regardless of wear....because of deterioration.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top