The Diesel Garage banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2007.5 Hd and im wondering how much I can tow?3/4 Hd ext cab Durmax. I Installed and B and w ball in the box and picked up a 2008 big tex goose neck. Truck 7000lbs and trailer 7000lbs. So what can I tow and how much? Trailer has trailer brakes.:smoke
 

·
'Ol Builder guy
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
There's a lot of limiting factors, but basically, you're limited by your truck's GCWR. If your truck weighs 7K and your trailer weighs 7K, then you would take your truck's GCWR and subtract 7,000 + 7,000 from that. So subtract 14,000 from your GCWR. That's your legal payload on your trailer. I'm on the east coast, where this is strictly enforced. Some of the southern & midwest states don't seem to enforce GCW ratings as strictly as we see a lot of our members going over the scales way in excess of what their trucks are rated for.

You also have to watch your tongue weight. Your rear axle is overloaded if you "front load" your trailer too much. You can run your truck across a scale to see how much load is on your rear axle. Let's say your rear axle capacity is 7,500 lbs. If you have your trucks empty rear weight + the tongue weight of the trailer is more than 7,500 lbs, you are overweigh on one axle and subject to fines. The crudest method is by looking at how much your truck rear is squatting. If you "tail load" the trailer too much, you'll lose control of your truck at highway speeds.

Best thing to do is take a few trips unloaded to get used to the trailer. When you're ready to pull a load, make sure you're bindered down correctly and have your load correctly positioned on your trailer. If you have a scale in your area, drive across it and see if your overweight.
 

·
resident mason
Joined
·
343 Posts
Trailer gwr is 7k or unladen 7k? Total wieght to comfortably pull for me is around 12k maybe 13k over the road. Probably go a little more if roads are good and it's a short trip. Either way that's a lot of weight on/behind a 3/4 ton. Air bags would help. Read the manual.
 

·
resident mason
Joined
·
343 Posts
I should add that w/ that much behind truck I'm not doing 65 either.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,705 Posts
We do things a bit different in the Midwest,that's for sure. I just got in last night with 30,000lbs behind my 01 2500. I weigh in at almost 17,000lbs empty though.
As long at your local DOT doesn't have issues with it and you have plates for it you're OK. Lots of diesels out here are plated for 40,000lbs. Some say it right on the side of the rig under their US DOT #. I try to stay under
40,000lbs but have plates for a bit heavier than that :sly: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im up here in Alberta,Canada. They arnt very stickey about trailer stuff. Ill be towing a trencher 10000lbs and a tidy tank of 97 Gallons of diesel. Trailer can carry 25500lbs. So with the truck/trailer and trencher i should be safe?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,754 Posts
ryanand kitty you should be ok
 

·
'Ol Builder guy
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
Hold on Ryan and Kitty.

This site does not suggest you can safely tow over your trucks GCWR. Any member here who tells you that it's totally safe is wrong.

Tow over your truck's capacity at your own risk.

I suggest staying within your trucks limits and if you need to tow more, buy a bigger truck.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,705 Posts
Let me say a few other things. You guys live in a completely different enviroment than we do in the midwest. It's 40mi to the nearest town and there isn't panic situations per say. The worst thing is a deer or cow and that's why a lot of us have bumpers like we do.
Evidently none of you have been around cattle or horse trailers much cause a 24'er is pretty much the standard size and they are around 4000lbs give or take and can haul 12, 1200-1500lb cows. That translates to around 20,000lbs+. They have been pulling those since the 70's with
3/4ton pickups around here. Now there's 30',36',and even 40' stock trailers that will haul 18-24 cows. They are designed to be pulled with a pickup and are more than safe to pull. You can also get a 3 axle 10K dually now that is designed to be pulled with a pickup. All have 2 5/16" ball hitches not 5th wheel hitch like a truck uses.
If you ever get into oil field country you'll see a 30' trailers loaded with way more than I would ever think of pulling. Some will push up to 50,000lbs behind these new Dodge duallys.

This is just an FYI guys so don't take any offence.
 
G

·
'01...I think all that is being said is that if you pull beyond the factory specs of your truck...be prepared to be your own warranty or own insurance company. No different when you mod a truck...be prepared to cover your own warranty. And like was stated...its not getting the load going...its getting it stopped in a panic. Yes...in the rural area where we live(you and I) panic stops are not common. but...all it takes is a lost family in a mini-van...or a teenager out riding a dirt bike for the first time. Nobody ever plans on a panic stop.

Nobody is dogging on you for the loads you pull. Shoot...my buddy's FIL would pull 30k worth of haybales behind his stock 99 PSD regularly...and the truck lasted for 150k miles before needing a new tranny. But...when he got caught crossing the scales with that load...the DOT made him park the truck...off load 20k worth of bales...and fines exceeding $2500.

He bought a Freightliner now to pull the load.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,705 Posts
I'm far past warranty anyway. As to the DOT,I hit the scale on our western border at 44,900lb and the DOT never said anything.I paid the $15 overwidth fee and was on my way. I have plates for 32K on my pickup and 30K on the trailer. The courthouse says I'm legal as long as I stay under that since I have farm plates but IDK.

4cstr said:
'01...I think all that is being said is that if you pull beyond the factory specs of your truck...be prepared to be your own warranty or own insurance company. No different when you mod a truck...be prepared to cover your own warranty. And like was stated...its not getting the load going...its getting it stopped in a panic. Yes...in the rural area where we live(you and I) panic stops are not common. but...all it takes is a lost family in a mini-van...or a teenager out riding a dirt bike for the first time. Nobody ever plans on a panic stop.

Nobody is dogging on you for the loads you pull. Shoot...my buddy's FIL would pull 30k worth of haybales behind his stock 99 PSD regularly...and the truck lasted for 150k miles before needing a new tranny. But...when he got caught crossing the scales with that load...the DOT made him park the truck...off load 20k worth of bales...and fines exceeding $2500.

He bought a Freightliner now to pull the load.
 

·
'Ol Builder guy
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
01duramax6spd said:
I'm far past warranty anyway. As to the DOT,I hit the scale on our western border at 44,900lb and the DOT never said anything.I paid the $15 overwidth fee and was on my way. I have plates for 32K on my pickup and 30K on the trailer. The courthouse says I'm legal as long as I stay under that since I have farm plates but IDK.
We can pretty much assume he doesn't have farm plates or a rural, somewhat uniformed DOT system like you have. We can't be telling guys it's OK to exceed your trucks' GCWR. Think of the consequences if a rookie loads a trailer with 15 tons of stuff and drives through the pumps in a gas station and blows a bunch of stuff up, and we told him "he'd be O.K."

We know you're just trying to help, but the best thing to do is let him know what's safe & legal, then explain in your area, that sort of thing is allowed, but you need to check your local laws, etc. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Duke said:
Hold on Ryan and Kitty.

This site does not suggest you can safely tow over your trucks GCWR. Any member here who tells you that it's totally safe is wrong.

Tow over your truck's capacity at your own risk.

I suggest staying within your trucks limits and if you need to tow more, buy a bigger truck.
Working the math I should be ok?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,705 Posts
I have Duke,see my previous post :deal: . It's not like I just do this once in a while,it's part of my business and I don't want stopped any more than the next guy.

Evidently most places are a bit different than here.

Thanks for your concerns.


Duke said:
but you need to check your local laws, etc. ;)
 

·
'Ol Builder guy
Joined
·
7,051 Posts
ryanandkitty said:
Working the math I should be ok?
You need to start by obtaining your GCWR. That's the max weight recommend that your total package (truck, trailer & cargo) should weigh. From what you've told us, your truck & trailer weigh 14,000lbs (7,000 truck+ 7,000 trailer). Take your truck's GCWR and subtract 14,000 lbs. That will be your maximum cargo weight.

Anything higher, and you could be liable for property damage, personal injury or warranty on your equipment, not to mention breaking the law in states that enforce the federal DOT guidelines. If you're in Canada you'll have to check your DOT laws there.

It's not like I've never been overweight on my trucks either, but I don't advise it nor does The Diesel Garage advise overloading a truck.
 

·
resident mason
Joined
·
343 Posts
It's easy to pull 20000 lbs on flat ground. Try and do that up the side of a mountain on dirt roads and forward progress quickly becomes backward progress. Sometimes I can't even make my own driveway in 4wheel peel w/ tractor behind, and that's only like 10000lbs. It all depends on conditions. Better safe than sorry.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
I got to admit I'm pulled a few heavy load in my time. Mostly firewood on trailers. I'm also in the rural back country of Idaho. So even with that I'm not proud to say I did it or can do it. But the simple fact remains that the brake system and drivetrian can only handle so much of this before failure occur.

If I ever pulled a heavy load I always took a back road (alternate route) and reduced my speed considerable so I could stop safety or avoid dangers...

I suggest to you that you don't make a common practice of it... It just not safe...

Just thinking of this here in Riggins, ID all the rafting companies are now REQUIRED to have DOT numbers and check in at the scales because of overloading trailers and vehicles. Trust me... They changed there practices quickly!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Ryan:

Duke is on point with the advice- No matter what anybody else says, does, suggests, or endorses, you should not ever exceed your GVWR OR GCWR. Exceeding either, as Duke has said, puts you and you alone as the one who will pay the cost of tickets, curb time, accidents, repairs, insurance, the whole enchilada.

I am not saying that members' trucks are not capable of hauling heavy loads, but it is very simple: you own a pickup truck. If you are going to be hauling massive loads like some of the people have bragged about, you need a truck designed to haul those loads legally and safely. How many pickup trucks do see connected to semi trailers? none. I can connect my truck to a semi trailer because the 5th wheel hitch assembly is the same, but my truck was not designed to haul that weight. That is why the GVWR/GCWR ratings exist.

As far as pickups go, the manufacturers will always list the towing capacities in their advertising based on the best equipped truck they offer, and everybody assumes that the truck they buy will tow the same. That is not true. extended and crew cabs' capacities are less than std. cabs.- Engines, trannies, rear end gear ratios, and axles add a lot of variables to the equation.

All you need to do is open the door of your truck, and look on the information label on the door or door post to find out exactly what the maximum your truck should weigh fully loaded(GVWR), and the maximum your truck should and trailer should weigh together(GCWR). The GAWR(axle weight rating) is NOT the same- those numbers tell you the max. weight that can be placed on the axles.

Happy hauling!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top