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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I just purchased a 28' enclosed Storm trailer, I am using my 08 F250 CC diesel to pull it. My trucks GVWR is 10,000 and I also registered my trailer to be the same. I am going to be hauling my 2003 Lightning in the trailer which should weigh in at around 3800-3900lbs. My question to you guys is, What is the best weight distribution anti sway bar set up to purchase?? I have never used one so any and all help would be appreciated.:happymugs
 

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For towing that truck with your truck you should be fine as is. I've towed way more than that with the 3/4 ton without any antisway bars and not a problem at all.
 

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I have not seen very many people use WD hitches on 3/4 ton. I have installed quite a few air bag systems to help out with the squatting but a far as sway I would not think you would need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks guys.:thumbsup I have not yet towed with my Lightning in the trailer. I only towed the trailer empty so far, and on my way home it was very windy 30mph gusts of wind on rt.80 here in NJ. That trailer swayed and I felt it with my truck. I guess when you are towing something shaped like a refrigerator with zero aerodynamics that it is to be expected with the sway. I guess I can do the air bags with an automatic load leveler like I have seen in Jegs and Summit. Do you guys that used air bags have any suggestions on which air bag system to go with??
 

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If you want the best then get a Hensley...

Look at the hitch, anything over 5000lbs should have a WD hitch. 3800 isnt there
but 28-ft box is pretty long. Truck will not squat with a WD hitch, that is what they
are for. You should not need air bags.

I see people pulling trailer that are going all over the place swaying, but they
deny they have sway. Almost all are just using the ball with no WD setup. Others
have the WD setup and still have sway. If you want ZERO sway then Hensley
or Pull-Rite are the only choices. Wind is not your friend

Each trailer is different, one may have issues where the others will not. Dont trust that
it will be OK just because someone with some other trailer didnt have a problem. Test yours
out before you are headed out for a planned trip, with the trailer fully loaded and in the wind.
 

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Equal-i-zer® brand is probably the most user friendly. The wd and sway is all in one. I have one on a 28 ft TT and it tows much better (much less sway) when I use it.......

My $.02 and worth what you paid for it......
 

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Definitely get some sort of WD hitch. It takes most of the bounce out of it and makes the trailer less sensitive on where you load the hauled vehicle. 6" too far forward or back makes a big difference. Then if you happen to throw a few coolers full of ice and beverages, a few suitcases, a toolbox, or..... towards the front of the trailer, just pick up another link on the chains and life is good. Also from a liability aspect- the hitch on the truck is probably only rated at 6-8k weight carrying, 10-12k distributing. If you got in an accident, it could be stated that you overloaded the hitch.
 

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The first thing is to weigh the equipment, truck then truck and trailer with axle weights.

From this you can get the hitch weight.

Next is a look at the state weight laws and the numbers stamped on the hitch componets.

You can weigh the cargo in or out of the trailer. If you axle the cargo there is a little math to figure the effect on the balance.

That said, I prefer a Reese hitch with sway cams, I have worn out 1, working on the second. There is nothing wrong with Valley Equip and they can mount Reese cams for sway control.

I do not like sway friction brakes, they simply resist changing - it is like not greasing the 5th wheel, does not want to change. Cams want to return to straight with the truck, they can be offset to balance a lead from the truck.

keydl
 

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I would definitely use a WD hitch of some sort with sway control. Go to an RV campground and look at what the retirees are using. They don't like white knuckle driving, and will spend the extra money for a much more user friendly towing experience. Most of these guys will have a WD hitch with sway control.

Hensley is supposed to be the best, but it is also very expensive.

The Reese dual cam is a nice setup.

The Equalizer is also very nice, and easy to switch from one trailer to another.

I am currently using a Curt, and I like it very well.

The more you look, the more opinions you will find. Go to a trailer store that sells a variety, and choose the best option for you.

Good luck,

Woody
 

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I would definitely use a WD hitch of some sort with sway control. Go to an RV campground and look at what the retirees are using. They don't like white knuckle driving, and will spend the extra money for a much more user friendly towing experience. Most of these guys will have a WD hitch with sway control.

Hensley is supposed to be the best, but it is also very expensive.

The Reese dual cam is a nice setup.

The Equalizer is also very nice, and easy to switch from one trailer to another.

I am currently using a Curt, and I like it very well.

The more you look, the more opinions you will find. Go to a trailer store that sells a variety, and choose the best option for you.

Good luck,

Woody
I second that look out on the interstate and most larger travel trailers are being towed by 3/4 and 1 ton trucks and are also equiped with an equalizer type hitch. I recently bought a 28' toy hauler it tows great up to about 8k lbs but when I have it fully loaded it weighs nearly 11k and this is how I usually use it. When fully loaded I have to use an equalizer hitch, and also inflate my air bags to about 35psi then it's fine if there is no cross winds, but a crosswind willl make it a white knuckle ride. I am also looking to add a Curt Trailer Sway Control kit but don't know much about them.

I suggest always doing a prictice tow of you intended load if you have not pulled it before. It may save a lot of grief in the end and will allow for time to reposition your load if needed.
 

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Anything above the ratings is an experiment. All is fine until is isn't.

Check craig's list and get a used hitch set.

Also don't get weight distribution and anti-sway mixed up. Unless you have a duel cam system the weight dist. system is just that.
 

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If you are going to run on ice, I would not want a friction sway control hooked up.

I have never run a Hensley - the leverage is hooked from near the axle, same as bobbing a frame for a toter so it is 3/4's of an in bed hitch.

The cams do not fight getting back straight on ice, they help. If they are a little light, wash the lube off. I used 75w-140 sometimes, but mostly not. We used them on a couple of 1 ton that were used to move mobile homes around town - Colorado Springs - even as far as Denver or Walsenburg of La Hunta. They were just to light for running in the wind.

Balance on the trailer is also a big factor, I was once feeling pore and loaded the heavy on the ends of a bumper pull with the light in the middle - it started fighting the lead at 51 on the speedometer, bumping over the hill to Grand Junction was not fun that run. And I was using an F700 with a Cat that usually rolled 65 up or down.

keydl
 

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ALL you need is anti sway bar setup. Go to a RV supply and get the ball's and a bracket and find a used anti sway bar. My whole setup cast me sway bar ($25) both balls and the bracket for your hitch ($35)

Do you weld or know sombody who does. Took me about 20 minutes to weld the bracket to my hitch and the ball to my trailer tounge. I'll get you some picture if i can remember to to night.

I pull the exact same trailer a 28 foot enclosed 8.5 wide 6'6" tall with tandem 4500 lb axels.

I use, (I think) a class 5 hitch with 6000lb tounge weight. My trailer is a 10% witch means 10% of the trailers weight rest on the hitch.

So the trailer weighs 3500 lbs nets 350 lbs of trailer weight plus how ever i position the load to weight the tounge.

You will need to play with the positioning of your load to find out what is the best position for you to haul it in. Pull it in, strap it down and take a drive down the interstate. See how it feels then move it forward and back and see how it feels. I know if I back load my trailer where the tounge has only about 40 to 50% of the load I get alot of speed wobble so I have to keep at least 60% of the weight forward. With 50% weight I can take care of the speed wobble with my sway bar but 40% gets scary quickly.....

After you get it to feel the right way while pulling it, mark it's wheel position on the floor.

Some people like to haul vehicle pulled in nose first, but I find if it is a front engine vehicle if you will back it in you have a little more trailer to work with because the engine weight is more over the trailer axels instead of between the hitch and the axels as it would be if it was nose in first.

Just MHO
 
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