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Just wanted to get the word out on a new type of Diesel Engine. This engine is called Buck Marine Diesel.

I work at Buck Marine Diesel. We are currently developing a prototype diesel engine specifically designed for inboard marine use, with some possible OTR applications in the future. We're still working on things right now. We're getting VERY close to getting the first prototype fully up and running. We had it running the other day and were able to make a little power.

We are currently working on a 6-cylinder model with 3- and 4-cylinder models to follow. The engines have a unique two injector per cylinder design that will increase the fuel mapping potential exponentially and result in lower emissions capability. The family of engines will range from 150 to 700 HP and have been designed from the bottom up with a totally different approach. These engines are capable of exceptional cooling, allowing for substantial improvements in power output while increasing longevity.

The cooling path for this engine is a fraction of most engines. In the classic designs, coolant flows into the front of the engine, all the way back to the rear cylinder, then back out the front. This means that the rear cylinder is always receiving water that has already been heated by the previous cylinders.

In the Buck Marine system, the coolant flows individually into and out of each cylinder. This means that the all of the cylinders will be operating at the same temperature at all times. Using individual and shorter cooling paths, will also help eliminate hot spots and temperature stacking.

The engine also has a dual cooling system that uses both an internal coolant as well as circulating raw water from whatever body of water the boat is in. This cooling system will keep the engine running cool, allowing us to generate more power. If a problem should arise, the engine is also very serviceable.

The modular cylinder design allows for easy maintenance. With our design, you can change an individual cylinder, head, piston, and connecting rod without having to remove the crank case. We are estimating that the entire upper half of the engine (cylinders, heads, pistons, and connecting rods ) could be entirely replaced in about 3 hours time. Each of the aforementioned parts is also interchangeable with each of the other cylinders and with the pther engines (a con rod off a 6 will fit a 3 or 4 cylinder model as well).

In addition, nearly every seal is made with an o-ring of some form, meaning that the gasket set for the entire engine can fit in a gallon-sized plastic bag. These two factors will significantly reduce part inventory. A video of the connecting rod replacement procedure is available on the website.

While running under a moderate load at about 2500 rpm, the exhaust temperatures were around 1000 degrees F. We were actually having problems getting the engine to heat up! We ended up having to shut the raw water supply almost completely off (just enough flow so we didn't burn up the impeller and a clamp on the hose going to the heat exchanger). We ran under those conditions for about 45 minutes. The hottest that the coolant pump got was about 200 degrees F. None of the 6 heads were over 160 degrees and all of them were within about 3 degrees of one another. The highest engine temperature we recorded was about 215 degrees F.

We will hopefully be back up and running by the end of next week. So far, we have only gotten about 160 Hp at 9 gal/hr fuel burn. My boss's boat has 2 Cat diesels, when he is burning 35 gal/hr, he gets about 565 Hp. So let's assume it's a linear trend, at 36 gal/hr, we will be getting about 640 Hp! We are extremely happy with these numbers and as soon as we get more, I will be sure to let everyone know.

Check out our website for further pictures and videos.

Feel free to ask any questions that you have.

Buck Marine Diesel

This is a video of our cylinder replacement procedure:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsgCHbptRRc

This is a video of our engine actually up and running:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5PkOV6gxZA
 

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Tim.,

If you don't mind one question to ask .,

When you ran the engine on the dynometer what was the raw water coolant tempture when you ran it ?

Merci,Marc
 

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Tim.,

If you don't mind one question to ask .,

When you ran the engine on the dynometer what was the raw water coolant tempture when you ran it ?

Merci,Marc
I too have some questions! The show ! in the animation the head being removed the the only thing that dosent make sence to me is the push tubes for the valves were never removed.the other is the rod cap what holds the rod cap in place once disconected from the rod? Curious!
The ideas are great if they work.
 

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When you ran the engine on the dynometer what was the raw water coolant tempture when you ran it ?
The raw water was being drawn from a large tank we have outside, so whatever the ambient air temperature was that day. I believe around 60 degrees F.

I too have some questions! The show ! in the animation the head being removed the the only thing that dosent make sence to me is the push tubes for the valves were never removed.the other is the rod cap what holds the rod cap in place once disconected from the rod? Curious!
The ideas are great if they work.
The pushrods are not shown in that video. They are located in the on the exhaust manifold side of the engine. They simply pull out when you take the head off.

There is a windage tray located underneath the mains, on top of the oil pan. When you take the bolts out of the rod and pull the rod out, the cap falls onto this tray. There is enough clearance that you can reach down past the crankshaft and pull the cap out. With the tray, you don't have to worry about the cap or any bolts that you drop falling into the oil.

Keep the questions coming!!!
 

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What is the displacement of those engines? Approximate weight? Are they manufactured from aluminum or are they shiney because they're new? I really like the design concepts. Good job.
 

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Tim.,

I am not sure if you are aware with this or not { I am pretty sure you allready now this } most marine engine manufacters do test the engines with raw water about 80°F or 85°F espcally that way it will affect the peformaice on the engine.


Merci,Marc
 

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What is the displacement of those engines? Approximate weight? Are they manufactured from aluminum or are they shiney because they're new? I really like the design concepts. Good job.
The cylinders are about 78 ci each. So a 6-cylinder is about 468 ci. When the 6 is fully loaded and ready to run, it weighs about 1500 lbs. The main engine carrier is cast iron. The cylinder jugs are aluminum with a cast iron sleeve.

Tim.,

I am not sure if you are aware with this or not { I am pretty sure you allready now this } most marine engine manufacters do test the engines with raw water about 80°F or 85°F espcally that way it will affect the peformaice on the engine.


Merci,Marc
We do realize that and when we have a full-scale-production-awesome-new-facility that's what we'll do :) For now, we're working with what we have, which is a big blue tank that sits outside the shop :)
 

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Tim
>The cylinder jugs are aluminum with a cast iron sleeve.<
I love the design of this engine simple is good.BUT.
Arent you guys setting your selves up for electrolosis and cavitation problems with ths idea????
would not a full cast sleeve be better?Salt water is my thought here!!
 

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Tim
>The cylinder jugs are aluminum with a cast iron sleeve.<
I love the design of this engine simple is good.BUT.
Arent you guys setting your selves up for electrolosis and cavitation problems with ths idea????
would not a full cast sleeve be better?Salt water is my thought here!!
The sleeve design (for now) is a dry sleeve, so unless you get salt water into your oil, there is no way that it can get to the sleeve. And if it's in your oil, You have bigger problems :)
 

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The sleeve design (for now) is a dry sleeve, so unless you get salt water into your oil, there is no way that it can get to the sleeve. And if it's in your oil, You have bigger problems :)
Your running the water into the aluminum case around the liner from the water rail correct??
 

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Your running the water into the aluminum case around the liner from the water rail correct??

Just hope he have heat exchanger in there and have it properly sized as well I allready dealted alot of MerCruiser with alum block with Cast Iron head and have pretty good instering set up with this unit.

{ the early verison have semi magreal heat exchanger that barely do the job the later one and modded verison have much larger exchanger on it }

Merci,Marc
 

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Hey all, sorry it has been a little while since I've posted. I've got a new clip of our engine. Check it out:


In this video, we take a running engine, shut it down and tear down a single cylinder to the bare crankshaft, rebuild it, and start the engine back up. All in less than 8 minutes!

Don't believe me? Watch it :)

Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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I realize that this is only a demo and would like to point out some odvious things in my mind.
There are no gaskets or orings to contend with (replace) if you were actually doing a rebuild ?If there are would you not have to reset the valves!
The coolant drain was omited as well.That also takes time and needs to be included in an actual rebuild situation!Does the coolant flow around the liner and into the head if so were there coolant jumper lines to disconect!If so those orings / gaskets would have likly needed replacing.As i said before this is a great design I comend you on the thought that went into it! Will this unit meet emissions standards when it comes time for marine to adhear to such standards?

fred
 

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I realize that this is only a demo and would like to point out some odvious things in my mind.
There are no gaskets or orings to contend with (replace) if you were actually doing a rebuild ?If there are would you not have to reset the valves!
The coolant drain was omited as well.That also takes time and needs to be included in an actual rebuild situation!Does the coolant flow around the liner and into the head if so were there coolant jumper lines to disconect!If so those orings / gaskets would have likly needed replacing.As i said before this is a great design I comend you on the thought that went into it! Will this unit meet emissions standards when it comes time for marine to adhear to such standards?

fred
Thanks for all the questions Fred!

So here goes:

All of the seals are done with o-rings, the only "gasket" is the copper ring that forms the head gasket. This can be seen on our website under the "Products" tab. This is the largest gasket on the engine. All of the rest of the seals are done with o-rings. This eliminates the need for scraping gaskets, RTV, etc. But yes, had we been replacing the o-rings, the valve lash would have to be reset. This would add about 30 seconds onto the rebuild.

We did omit the coolant draining and refilling. There is a coolant drain on either side of the engine. One for the exhaust manifold and one for the cylinder jugs and carrier. They are 3/8" NPT valves. Draining the coolant can be done while the intake manifold is loosened and the valve cover and fuel lines are being removed. Refilling it would add about a minute onto the time.

The coolant flow in this engine comes into the bottom of the jug, around the cylinder, up through the head, and finally through a heat exchanger mounted inside the exhaust manifold and back into the coolant pump. If you look at the "Upper End Replacement" video on our website and go to about 40 seconds, you can see the 4 o-ring grooves on the top of the cylinder jug. The 2 larger holes are where the pushrods pass through and are used for oil drain-back from the head. The 2 smaller holes, on the intake manifold side, are the coolant flow holes. There are no "jumper" lines.

As Mike said in the video, if we had new parts handy, we would have put them on. So, with replacing all the o-rings (which would already be placed in the new parts), draining and refilling the coolant, and resetting your valve lash, we are still looking at probably under 10 minutes for a teardown and rebuild.

As for emissions, we haven't done any testing yet, but when the time comes, we think we'll be ok.

Please feel free to keep the questions coming!
 

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are these engines available to buy now.
 

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are these engines available to buy now.
Unfortunately, no. We are still working to secure the capital to move into full-scale production. We're trying to create a Made in the USA product that will create about 200 American jobs, but we can't seem to find any help.
 

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Far as I'm concerned you guys should just biuld one or 2 at a time and sell em The concept is good old down to earth simple Basic old school concept It will be good for those who want to repower older boats!, build it they will come aditude.It apears you guys have put forth a lot of effort to build this and would be a shame not to continue ,no mater how small or big it gets.If you have ever looked into the new regs on this stuff you may not want to go full bore into this keep it small
I think you will find you'll want to keep it that way!
I hear tell these days you need particulate traps and yada yada on boats as well .
Your R+d would likly go thru the roof if you have to contend with this stuff.
 

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Far as I'm concerned you guys should just biuld one or 2 at a time and sell em The concept is good old down to earth simple Basic old school concept It will be good for those who want to repower older boats!, build it they will come aditude.It apears you guys have put forth a lot of effort to build this and would be a shame not to continue ,no mater how small or big it gets.If you have ever looked into the new regs on this stuff you may not want to go full bore into this keep it small
I think you will find you'll want to keep it that way!
I hear tell these days you need particulate traps and yada yada on boats as well .
Your R+d would likly go thru the roof if you have to contend with this stuff.
Man I wish we could do that. Unfortunately, these things obviously cost money to do. We still don't have everything tuned and running the way we want it to so we couldn't really sell one yet.

As far as emissions and all that, we've spoken with the EPA and apparently we are giving them a problem. Our idea is to wash the exhaust gas with the raw water flow as it comes out of the manifold. This will trap a lot of the particulates and reduce the emissions. From what the have told us, no one else has ever done something like that and they're not sure how to measure it :)
 

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Man I wish we could do that. Unfortunately, these things obviously cost money to do. We still don't have everything tuned and running the way we want it to so we couldn't really sell one yet.

As far as emissions and all that, we've spoken with the EPA and apparently we are giving them a problem. Our idea is to wash the exhaust gas with the raw water flow as it comes out of the manifold. This will trap a lot of the particulates and reduce the emissions. From what the have told us, no one else has ever done something like that and they're not sure how to measure it :)
Ce drôle., Vous devriez voir ce que le moteur marin majeur du gaz manufacter fait cela pendant longtemps et alot de moteur diesel utilise pour la demande(l'application) marine pour l'échappement humide ils ont utilisé l'eau de mer de décharge après le turbocompresseur ou au-dessus de la haute contremarche du collecteur d'échappement.

L'échappement humide n'est pas trop mal, mais l'échappement sec maintenant qu'est la question(publication) especally avec de nouveaux règlements obtenant plus plus strict sur cela ainsi quelque chose que vous pouvez que vouloir le contrôle utilise même le DPF {le Filtre de Particule Diesel} je sais qu'il produira assez bon quantité de chaleur à moins que vous ne mettiez une veste d'eau autour du PDF pour le garder le niveau sûr pour useage marin.

That funny ., You should see what the major marine gas engine manufacter done this for very long time and alot of diesel engine use for marine application for wet exhaust they used dump sea water after turbocharger or above high riser of the exhaust manifold.

The wet exhaust is not too bad but dry exhaust now that is the issue especally with new regulations getting more stricter on this so something you may want check out even use the DPF { Diesel Particulate Filter } I know it will generate pretty good amount of heat unless you put a water jacket around the PDF to keep it safe level for marine useage.

Merci,Marc
 
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