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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not a comm. trucker, so if I letter my own truck with "Not For Hire" on the sides, and the truck is an IH S1900 w/GVW of 32.000 lb. do I have to stop at weigh stations and do I have to pay for all those state permits when traveling?

Would I still need a CDL?
 

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I Kalifornia, anything over 26000 GVWR needs a CDL, class B or A (me thinks that is a federal law). The not for hire means nothing anything rated over 10K needs to stop at weigh stations (except pickups). The only way out is to get licensed as a motorhome/house car. If you have a sleeper that meets your state's criteria for a motorhome, you can do so. I don't know about AZ though.
 

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Rick from Paso said:
I Kalifornia, anything over 26000 GVWR needs a CDL, class B or A (me thinks that is a federal law). The not for hire means nothing anything rated over 10K needs to stop at weigh stations (except pickups). The only way out is to get licensed as a motorhome/house car. If you have a sleeper that meets your state's criteria for a motorhome, you can do so. I don't know about AZ though.
Agreed. under 26k no CDL. Over 26k= CDL.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, so what does the "Not for hire" signs mean? Would I still have to buy the state permits?
 

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Not for hire simply means that they do not have (and cannot obtain) an ICC/DOT number. Ie: the vehicle is NOT used for any commercial purpose, EVER.

There are tons of folks that place this on their vehicles in an attempt to skirt the law, they all get caught eventually. Those scale officers are well educated in the laws, and you will not fool them (for long, if at all).

I am NOT SURE, but I think that you do not have to mess with IFTA, tax reporting etc, if "Not for Hire".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I now realize I'd have to stop at the weigh stations, but what about the state permits? Aren't they primarily for fuel taxes? Is the cost of them dependent on weight, number of axles, etc?

You can see I don't know much about all this.
 

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Again, you better check with your local Dept of Motor vehicles. Here in the people's republik everything with a bed is considered commercial and pays weight fees as all commercial vehicles (because they can). If you put a shell or camper on the bed, you don't have to pay weight fees and get car plates. But if you take it off and get caught, big fines are assessed. For hire or real commercial vehicles have to obtain a Municipal Carrier Permit from the state police (CHP) or an ICC/DOT permit if you are operating across state lines. You are considered for hire or commercial if you use your truck for business purposes or even if you haul your neighbors horse and are reimbursed fuel (I found out from a CHP officer). If you go to an RV site (MDTs and HDTs are very popular for hauling 5th wheels now) and search their forums, you can find all kinds of info about commercial vs motorhome licenses for most states.

check out my buddies at:

http://escapees.infopop.cc/eve/ubb.x?a=frm&s=256606751&f=700606661

and the HDT forum at the same discussion board.
 

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go to www.safersys.org/ you fill in info and it will tell you what you need.I can tell as long as you are haulling your own stuff you dont need dot #.but if you haul somebody else stuff and you charge them then you need dot #.I my self have a excavating comp and haul 99% for my self but once in a blue moon i will haul for someone else like gravel or there backhoe,and thats when i needed dot#.its no big deal to get them and to obay the laws.when you go to safersys on left side of page click on fmcsa registration&updates.there you anser the ? and it will tell you what you need.
 

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Dont forget that towing a trailer for commerce , greater than 10,000lbs Gvw also requires a CDL endorsment.
 

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everyone has basicly coverd all the laws. Every state is diffrent and sadly what works in one state may not work in another. some states will require permits if you pass through others will not. It has gotton better but there still are a few nazi states that dont want to conform and work with the majority of the states. I bob tailed from KC M.O to Chicago IL when I bought my Rig in 05. I got stopped at a scale and they made me buy fuel permits and a temp registration.....5 miles from the border! B.S. if you ask me but thats how our goverment wants to stick us. needles to say learn the laws of the states you pass through and better yet learn to avoid the scales if you have an issue.. just dont get cought bypassing a scale on a back road they love to mess with you if they know you were trying to get around them!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
fmcsa says I need to file as a "motor carrier". Can't figure out why. There questions don't make any sense to me.
 

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I'm not a comm. trucker, so if I letter my own truck with "Not For Hire" on the sides, and the truck is an IH S1900 w/GVW of 32.000 lb. do I have to stop at weigh stations and do I have to pay for all those state permits when traveling?

Would I still need a CDL? You must check state law. Not for hire does not mean you cannot get your authority or ICC number it's not about you can't get it it's about you don't need it not for hire simply means you are not carrying for profit you can haul your own product look if you are a dairy Farmer and you have hay in another field in another state and it is your hay and you just need to get it across the United States you can legally run not for hire it's not about a scam and I love this guy blow your answer that says he knows everything and then down through it he says I think. Wow I think that's why they've kind of guys that scares me. You either know it or you don't so yes most of the time if you are operating a vehicle with air brakes over 26000 pounds you are required to have a air brake endorsement it depends again on your state it.I also suggest that if you are going to take your truck and it is capable of 32000 + pounds into another state that you're not familiar with just simply Google the state laws because the laws clearly say that the federal law is in fact the bottom line that is Federal motor Carrier safety regulations. They have one of those silly loopholes and that keeps this industry from uniting and having one law across the board that is you must obey all federal laws pertaining to commercial vehicles unless the state law supersedes it in safety that is the federal quote so another words a state can simply say our highways are horrible they are way too small and it would be unsafe for a truck to travel that is capable of carrying 80,000 pounds throughout our state over 55 miles an hour.at that point you must obey it because it is a state law however you can take the same truck with the same load and you can go across some of the highways in Texas legally at the posted speed limit of yes 85 miles an hour anyhow have a wonderful evening just reading up on your website it's kind of cute seeing all of these people that have opinions that they think LOL it never hurts to ask and I wish people would not pick on people because they just want to learn the truth I've been driving commercial truck since 1979 over for 4 million miles accident free ticket free. I say thank you Father give the credit where it's due. Anyways I'm still out here hauling produce all over the United States mostly the East coast from the West coast so when you and your loved ones are sitting down having a wonderful dinner and you get that fresh dinner salad with those veggies at your wife work so hard to put together don't forget us old fart truck drivers. Bobby
 
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