The Diesel Garage banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here we have it, all info, hard core tech or not, and issues you may encounter. What makes a 12valve such a cool engine to tinker with. This section is for the P-pump 6BT's from 94-98, and also covers most any other engine that this pump went on. Hopefully will help the new diesel owners understand their fuel system a little better. Get gauges, and a good aftermarket tranny or clutch before adding power, that's the #1 rule!

-I'll start with the link to the how-to article I made about sliding the fuel plate and/or grinding one:
http://www.thedieselgarage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6815

-Here's an article on how to shim the gov. springs:
http://www.thedieselgarage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15496 You can also tighten the stock ones 1-4 "clicks", or purchase a gov. spring kit. Just my 2 cents here, but for those looking to purchase a GSK, a 3k kit for manual tranny trucks, and 4k for automatics are guidelines for a typical street driven truck. They are made up to 6500 rpm, from what I remember.

-AFC adjustments are covered in the fuel plate article. Then, for those that have a #0 or 100 plate, you'll need to take off the whole AFC housing and match the fuel plate profile to the little leg on the AFC.

-Fuel rack stop, there's a plug at the front end of the pump for adjusting full rack travel. You have to loosen the pump from the timing case to get it off though. Some people have made a thicker washer, or doubled up the washers to achieve the increased rack travel.

-Timing, how far advanced will depend on how much power you want and where in the rpm range you want it. And here's a link with info:
http://www.dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/FAQ/timing.htm

-KDP(killer dowel pin) the enemy of the timing gears. Timing case has an alignment pin by the water pump that can fall out unless it's been fixed with either the jig or a tab.

-delivery valves are in the top of the pump, just under where the injector lines attach to the pump. Bigger del. valves are sold, and typically the .191's are an upgrade over stock. There's also laser cut ones for those that cant seem to make enough black smoke.

-Overflow valve is on the top corner of the pump by the oil filler. Also called pressure relief valve. If it gets weak, the engine will puff white smoke, be hard to start, and a few other issues. You can stretch the little spring inside, but sometimes it's better to just get a new one every 150k miles(give or take).

-Fuel shut-off relay in the firewall above the intake manifold. Ususally there's 3, sometimes just 2. Original ones say HiRam on the outside of the relay. When it's bad, it'll crank & not start at all or sometimes it will/ sometimes it wont. Good to keep a spare in the glove box! To verify it's gone bad, try to start the truck. If it doesnt start, leave the key in the "run" position and lift the lever at the end of the shutoff solenoid as high as possible. If the relay was bad, the sol. will stay up, and you can start the truck as normal.

-Starter contacts burn up & you just get a click, but no start. LarryB's makes oversized contacts to solve the problem and save over $200(most people think the starter itself is bad). Most likely the starter will be fine & just the contacts get burned up. It took me about an hour to do mine.

-fuel strainer screen, next to the lift pump & primer pump. It should be cleaned of sediment & goo that accumulate in it yearly.

-injectors, you know where they go. The best bang for the buck goes to the 370, named after the marine version of the 6BT rated at 370hp. There's Extrude Honed verions for even more power, and EDM's in case you want more power, lower smoke & EGT's.

-Ratings: 94-95 auto=160hp, 94-95 manual=175hp, 96-98 auto=180hp, 96-98 manual=215hp, 96-98 manual (CA equipped)=180hp.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ironworker94dodge

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,514 Posts
seems like a really thorough start. Good tips summed up in one post. good job man.
Sean
 

·
cookiemonsterblue
Joined
·
172 Posts
fuel strainer screen, next to the lift pump & primer pump. It should be cleaned of sediment & goo that accumulate in it yearly.

???????? I am getting ready to do this. is this repair really hard should i think about having a shop do it? If I can do it any tips on how it is done.

Also are valve adjustments a do it yourself or a pay to play?

I am always game for a challenge but it truelly sucks when you bite off more than you can chew.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The strainer is really easy, just a "one wrench" job. Should take about 30 min. to do. Sometimes you can get away with re-using the o-ring, otherwise there's a kit you can get from Cummins or Mopar. http://www.dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/filter/pre-filt_clean.htm

Valve adjustments are the same as any other engine(that has adjustable rockers). Just make sure the engine is cold. It's easier to work on than you think.
 

·
cookiemonsterblue
Joined
·
172 Posts
hey thanks
my local garage said that it was a real sonofagun they were gonna charge extra to do it.
that's why i asked for a second opinion.:bow:
 

·
cookiemonsterblue
Joined
·
172 Posts
all right next ??? in your mods u didn't mention adjusting boost. I am in my infancy stage of diesel power(just did bhaf, 4" exhaust and gauges) I thought that if you did a fuel mod you had to also do an air mod. My plans for the near future are valves, screen, timing cover gasket(and dowel), sliding the fuel plate and playing with boost. you mention springs and timing. is there a basic how to website for this kinda stuff? which ones should be done:Thumbup:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
When you add fuel, the boost will go up. Not much to do there, unless you plan on injectors of 215's or bigger, then a bigger turbo or 2 will be needed.

dodgeram.org has some good how-to's on timing and valve adjustment.
 

·
cookiemonsterblue
Joined
·
172 Posts
forgive my stupidity I hear all these guys talking about raising boost. you are saying change fuel plate turbo will keep up.
Next question do you have a better description of what to ground off the fuel plate to make it a one? I saw the pictures but they are not a good enough pic to start grinding away on a fuel plate. while we are on the subject of grinding do i need to be careful on effecting the metal by the heat of grinding.:splat
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you increase the fuel rate, it will make more boost because of the extra fuel. Most trucks have a wastegate, which opens up at a certain set pressure to keep from overspinning the turbo and getting too much boost from it. They raise the boost pressure by blocking off or putting in a boost elbow at the wastegate. Sometimes it helps clean up the exhaust smoke, and other times it'll make the EGT jump up too high. A stock truck will make around 20 pounds. After the plate is slid, it should be around 30(give or take a few).
For the fuel plate, this link has a pretty good layout of the differences:
http://img242.imageshack.us/img242/7640/25501plateprofileszr0.png
 

·
cookiemonsterblue
Joined
·
172 Posts
that is much better then the pic i saw. when i am done grinding that side off i reinstall pushed all the way forward???
I am so ready to see what this does:nunu: :Thumbup:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yep, all the way forward is max fuel. Then set the AFC housing all the way forward too, and adjust the star wheel so the power comes in quicker
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
2 Posts
Here we have it, all info, hard core tech or not, and issues you may encounter. What makes a 12valve such a cool engine to tinker with. This section is for the P-pump 6BT's from 94-98, and also covers most any other engine that this pump went on. Hopefully will help the new diesel owners understand their fuel system a little better. Get gauges, and a good aftermarket tranny or clutch before adding power, that's the #1 rule!

-I'll start with the link to the how-to article I made about sliding the fuel plate and/or grinding one:
http://www.thedieselgarage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6815

-Here's an article on how to shim the gov. springs:
http://www.thedieselgarage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15496 You can also tighten the stock ones 1-4 "clicks", or purchase a gov. spring kit. Just my 2 cents here, but for those looking to purchase a GSK, a 3k kit for manual tranny trucks, and 4k for automatics are guidelines for a typical street driven truck. They are made up to 6500 rpm, from what I remember.

-AFC adjustments are covered in the fuel plate article. Then, for those that have a #0 or 100 plate, you'll need to take off the whole AFC housing and match the fuel plate profile to the little leg on the AFC.

-Fuel rack stop, there's a plug at the front end of the pump for adjusting full rack travel. You have to loosen the pump from the timing case to get it off though. Some people have made a thicker washer, or doubled up the washers to achieve the increased rack travel.

-Timing, how far advanced will depend on how much power you want and where in the rpm range you want it. And here's a link with info:
http://www.dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/FAQ/timing.htm

-KDP(killer dowel pin) the enemy of the timing gears. Timing case has an alignment pin by the water pump that can fall out unless it's been fixed with either the jig or a tab.

-delivery valves are in the top of the pump, just under where the injector lines attach to the pump. Bigger del. valves are sold, and typically the .191's are an upgrade over stock. There's also laser cut ones for those that cant seem to make enough black smoke.

-Overflow valve is on the top corner of the pump by the oil filler. Also called pressure relief valve. If it gets weak, the engine will puff white smoke, be hard to start, and a few other issues. You can stretch the little spring inside, but sometimes it's better to just get a new one every 150k miles(give or take).

-Fuel shut-off relay in the firewall above the intake manifold. Ususally there's 3, sometimes just 2. Original ones say HiRam on the outside of the relay. When it's bad, it'll crank & not start at all or sometimes it will/ sometimes it wont. Good to keep a spare in the glove box! To verify it's gone bad, try to start the truck. If it doesnt start, leave the key in the "run" position and lift the lever at the end of the shutoff solenoid as high as possible. If the relay was bad, the sol. will stay up, and you can start the truck as normal.

-Starter contacts burn up & you just get a click, but no start. LarryB's makes oversized contacts to solve the problem and save over $200(most people think the starter itself is bad). Most likely the starter will be fine & just the contacts get burned up. It took me about an hour to do mine.

-fuel strainer screen, next to the lift pump & primer pump. It should be cleaned of sediment & goo that accumulate in it yearly.

-injectors, you know where they go. The best bang for the buck goes to the 370, named after the marine version of the 6BT rated at 370hp. There's Extrude Honed verions for even more power, and EDM's in case you want more power, lower smoke & EGT's.

-Ratings: 94-95 auto=160hp, 94-95 manual=175hp, 96-98 auto=180hp, 96-98 manual=215hp, 96-98 manual (CA equipped)=180hp.
i was reading through some old post and ran up on this one and so i gave it a bump--so to help answer someone questions
 

·
Pappy
Joined
·
515 Posts
all right next ??? in your mods u didn't mention adjusting boost. I am in my infancy stage of diesel power(just did bhaf, 4" exhaust and gauges) I thought that if you did a fuel mod you had to also do an air mod. My plans for the near future are valves, screen, timing cover gasket(and dowel), sliding the fuel plate and playing with boost. you mention springs and timing. is there a basic how to website for this kinda stuff? which ones should be done:Thumbup:
Not trying to rain on your parade but you need to STOP everything else and do that dowel pin ASAP!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top