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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 83. Blazer with a 6.2L. Alright, so I feel like a ******* but the story goes like this. I get home from work shut off my engine. The next morning it won't start. Seeing that the glowplug light only flickers for a moment and knowing that the controller is going out, I figure it just isn't getting hot enough to fire up. So I take the bike to work. The next morning I'm up before dawn and I put a manual switch on the glow plugs. I'd been meaning to do this for a while. It was a successful opporation. Much to my disappointment it didn't help. So I figure it's fuel. I have never changed the fuel filters in the 3 years I've had this truck so I decide it's time. I have to order them in because the olny parts store within 15 mile is kragen. I could ride my bicycle further to napa, but east oakland in the dark is not fun. So I change the filters fill them with fuel. Start cranking the motor and after several seconds it fires up for about 2 minutes then sputters and dies. My brother comes over and says maybe you're just out of gas. I'm like yeah right! What, you think I'm stupid? So he takes the gas cap off and rocks the truck. Silence. No splashing sounds, nothing bone dry. All I can say is that I'm glad it was my brother making that discovery not my ex girlfriend.
Here comes the question.
So assume that when I got it to run was from the fuel in the filters. Do I just put a few gallons in the tank fill up the filters and let it crank for 10 seconds at a time hoping the battery won't run dry? Or is there a better way to prime the system?
 

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FUEL,FUEL,FUEL not Gas:RTFM: :pointlaugh
Seriously there's not an easy way to prime those things. NAPA has a solicone spray that uses a propane propellant and you can actually run the engine on it until it primes. What ever you do don't let anyone talk you into using ether or a gas rag to start it.:badidea:
 

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A cheap electric fuel pump jumped into the flex line will prime the fuel filters in a short - short. And It will pull fuel through the pump long enough to pick up a battery charge so it will start when the prime is lost in taking the pump out.

The fuel line at the tank generally is rotted anyway so a new one is good maint and a short piece of fuel line stays with the pump for the next job.

Last one cost $38 - well worth the risk to battery and starter.

keydl
 

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Does your blazer have a box fuel filter on the firewall or does it have a spin on one? I have a 86 6.2 diesel with a box filter in it. All I do when I change my filter is to open the air bleed port on top of the filter assembly and then crank the engine until fuel starts to come out. Be sure to have a container to catch the fuel. Then close the air bleed port screw. This should get all the air out of the system. This method of priming the fuel system has always worked for me. And I've had the truck for 10 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the spin on variety filters. I guess the big deal is getting fuel from the tank to the filters, huh?
So please help me understand what needs to happen. I can start the vehicle with the fuel in the filters. Alright. No problem. Then it dies because there is air between the tank and the filters? Is this correct? Or is this the sign of another problem? For that matter is that the time to bust out the silicone starter spray?
I have heard of guys using compressed air and opening the air valve on the primary until fuel comes out. That's cool but I don't have an air compressor. Will monster diesel's trick work on a "spin on filter"? Thanks!
 

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gravyboat said:
For that matter is that the time to bust out the silicone starter spray?

NO!!! Don't mix starting fluid with glow plugs!! They go boom and can break the tips off.


And you got the right idea, You just need to get the fuel to the filter. Nothing else is wrong, yet

I was gonna suggest putting pressurized air into the tank to push the fuel up to a loosened filter, but if you don't have shop air that will make it a little tough. A portable air tank or even a tire w/ 20psi in it would help.

Monsters trick will still work. I'd either disconnect the IP solenoid or fill the filter up, and run it off a fuel can sitting just above the filter the get a gravity feed until the LP starts to pump fuel to the filter.
 

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The 6.2 has a mechanical lift pump without a prime lever. The problem with cranking is that as the lift pump looses suction from slightly less functional check valves the starter is more used and the batteries may not be prime condition and cold.

A hand tire pump has plenty of capacity with an adapter - take 10 min and make an adapter, pump a couple of pounds of air pressure in and open the air bleed or a fitting.

The electric fuel pump is just a few min and a vacuum pump works well.

If you quit at the first stumble - starting is not much of a strain BUT I just saw (second hand) a $1600 bill for running out of fuel and killing the batteries (new), starter (new) needing a tow and a 50 mile ride home. The injection pump that was replaced was not defective. The fuel gage WAS inaccurate.
The shop was NOT competent.

The thing is if there is not 2# pressure in the injection pump it will not start, it will probably take 200 revolutions of the engine to do the prime or pick the alternative - any of them. The engine should start by the 2nd or 3 piston up and quicker when warm.

keydl
 

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Dual K20s mentioned something I left out. You must disconnect the injection pump solenoid. It's a one wire connection in front of the pump. This way as you're cranking the motor over you're not pumping in fuel to the motor. The purpose is to get the air out of the fuel system first. I forgot to do that one time and had a hell of a time trying to prime it. I had to put the battery charger on it cause it wore down my batterys. I wont forget next time LOL!
 

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I like to put an electric fuel pump on the fender well near the AC receiver drier. It's grounded, and I use a small cable with a clamp to connect it to the battery positive when I need it. Inline with the lift pump, it's just a hose when the engine is running and it's not on. But it works great to get air out of the line. In a pinch, I've used it to pump diesel from my tank to a fuel can for a friend in need.
 
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