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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter #1
Noticed today a wet look below the pinion on my differential. It appears my seal is leaking. I verified the vent tube is working, I blow in and it blows back the nice gear lube odor.

So I've done some searching and it looks like maybe I can just replace the seal.

Wish I had the cash right now to go all the way and redo it throwing in a Detroit Locker but not gonna happen.

Let me know how I should approach this we have several trips planned this summer with the travel trailer. It looks like it just started oozing a little.

:wave
 

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First check that you have no up and down movement and it is tight. If that is good clean it up then use a marker to index the nut on the pinion. Remove the nut, flange, and then the seal. Replace the seal and reinstall slightly past your index mark. I've replaced many seals this way and have never had a problem.
 

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Mine started leaking last year. Had the seal replaced and good ever since. I believe they used a shim due to wear to keep it tight and leak free.
 
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Curmudgeon
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First check that you have no up and down movement and it is tight. If that is good clean it up then use a marker to index the nut on the pinion. Remove the nut, flange, and then the seal. Replace the seal and reinstall slightly past your index mark. I've replaced many seals this way and have never had a problem.
Agreed, as long as your flange sealing surface is not significantly grooved. I'm not sure if there is a worn sealing surface kit for these, but if there is it's a good way to reuse the flange by just adding the ring. Otherwise a new flange is necessary along with a new crush spacer and nut, following the torque setting in the manual.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Hoping to work on it Sunday. Busy these days. I also have a couple thousand lbs of coal in in the bed that has to come out Saturday. Appreciate the advice hopefully it's just a seal, I know it just started as I did a fluid change this winter and put my 08 aluminum cover on it. All was good then and that wasn't too many miles ago. I'm just under 130k and didn't think I'd be having a seal issue but based on my searches it seems to be yet another common issue. :bdh
 

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Stuck in Commiefornia...
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Do yourself a favor and get a new seal a new pinion nut and a new crush sleeve. Drain the fluid into a clean drain pan. Check the back lash on the ring gear with a dial indicator. Mark the pinion flange/yoke relative to the driveshaft and to the pinion gear. Remove the pinion nut and pull the flange/yoke with a puller. DO NOT BEAT ON THE PINION OR THE FLANGE/YOKE WITH A HAMMER! Use a big screwdriver to pop the seal out of the housing. Use a seal installer to install the new seal. There should be an oil slinger, then the bearing, then the crush sleeve. If you get a reusable crush sleeve, they come with a solid bushing and a variety of shims. You measure your old one and duplicate the thickness with the new one. Use a good micrometer or caliper and be precise, too thick or too thin will not only change the bearing preload but the engagement of the pinion to the ring gear.

If you can't get a seal installer, you can make one with a hole saw and a couple hunks of 2x4. Cut a couple 6" lengths. Mark the center and cut a 1-1/2"-2" hole in two of them. Screw them together and then add a top with no hole. This gives you somewhere to tap against and drive the seal into the housing squarely without damaging the seal. And you can make this for under $10 in 10 minutes after the guy's head explodes at the part storewhen you ask for a specialty tool.

Anyway, once the seal is in, lube it good and torque the nut down. If you used a shim pack in place of the crush sleeve, torque the nut to spec and check your backlash, if it is the same as before, seal it up and refill. If you used a crush sleeve, check the pinion movement and the backlash and take steps to the final torque, old bearings are not supposed to be as tight as new bearings.

When in doubt, take it to a pro.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Got the seal replaced tonight not a bad job if you can locate your gear puller in a timely manner. I found mine at the parts store today after searching the shop Tuesday night.

The Ford dealer I got the seal at only sells and services Ford trucks so I took it as a sign when they only had the seal on the shelf and the nut and crush washer was by order only. I opted to do just the seal. One tip from my Chiton manual was to count the threads exposed so I did that and punched some marks. I used a scribe to mark the hub and got the seal removed. The nut appeared to have blue loctite on it before so I put a little on it upon installation. To put the seal in I discover one of my old serp belt idler pulleys fit it perfectly so I knocked out the bearing and used it to drive the seal with a soft mallet.

Reinstalled the nut and put it a couple of seconds past the mark.

Thanks again for the advice.
 

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When I do a pinion seal I always use the over size seal and sleave kit. I have a 3/8 by 3 flat bar with holes to mount the yoke, and tighten the nut, I learned it is a good idea to buy a new nut. Tighten till it has 0 back lash, then I remove the bar and check with an inch pound torque wrench to a higher value than it was at. You are going to tighten it a little more than it was so changing the crush sleave is not needed.
Just a thought!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The flange was in great shape no groove at all. Not sure the reason for a new nut recommendation/requirement. I used a small amount of loctite and put two light punches on it after tightening back in position.

The original nut appeared to have a loctite application on it.
 

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The nut is a crimped nut and when you remove it you wear the crimp, a new nut is cheap, I use never seize on the threads, and wire brush them, to ensure I do as little damage to the crimp while I am tightening it up.
On a class eight warrenty demand you change the nut on all steel crimp nuts. The nylon lock type are reusable.
Just a thought!
 

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pinnion seal

I think ford had a problem with pinion seals as I did one on an 03 for my brothers grandson and it was as you said no wear on yoke, new seal took care of it.:usflag
Ed
 
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