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Discussion Starter #1
I have looked everywhere and cannot find a 3 core radiator, it seems that all the aftermarket " high performance" radiators are still a 2 core like the stock radiator. do those really make a difference since they are the same size and same material as the stock aluminum radiator.
 

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Stuck in Commiefornia...
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The stock radiator should be sufficient, it works fine even on F-550s that see maximum capacity.

An aftermarket all aluminum radiator would be absolutely fine too. With the aftermarket radiators the tubes are typically a little bigger and the fin count is typically adjusted accordingly. Be careful with stuff that's advertised as high efficiency or higher fin counts and even added rows. Those changes can actually prevent air flow through the radiator in the gate any game you would get from the extra investment in a supposedly better part.


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Discussion Starter #3
I am sure some of you are asking.... why would i need a bigger radiator...?
at this stage i am not positive i do, however, on my last trip in very mountainous conditions was temp was hovering at 220 and i had fueling issues and did not have all the power i could use. the 1997 to 2003 7.3 radiator is installed in a 1975 motorhome and used to cool a 1993 cummins 5.9, i went that route because of space limitations between the frame rails, the radiator has a very large intercooler in front of it and also a very large transmission oil cooler, i am running an allison mtb643 capable of 73,000lbs gvwr so i needed a large cooler. in order to limit the heat load ahead of the radiator i installed the a/c condenser on the roof. summer is coming and we will hit 100 this week already. i am running a 19" six blade fan with HD fan clutch.
i was just trying to get some feedback about cooling issues, if any with the 7.3 and also wondering if the aftermarket all aluminum radiators do improve cooling.
here are pictures of the project..
https://picasaweb.google.com/104905260722286217761/AVCOMotorhome
 

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Stuck in Commiefornia...
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Sounds like you need more airflow, not more radiator then. Getting airflow to a radiator in a motor coach is a task.


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Moving the ac condensor away from the radiator was a good idea.

A larger capacity aluminum radiator can help, but will cost you $$.

Make sure your t-stat is opening up correctly.

Rigging a water tank supplied spray nozzle to mist the radiator under severe load conditions can help but is not a long term severe load solution.

Bigger coolant capacity and higher airflow like Idaho mentioned is likely to result in the best solution. Moving the transm cooler away from the raditor can help also, you can also rig up an electric fan to cool the transm cooler if relocated. Baja race vehicles use this method.

If any part of the transm cooling system uses an in tank radiator system, eliminating the flow through the radiator portion can make a big difference too.

Harry
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the "donor" motorhome was a pusher, this motorhome is an older style front engine, air flow is as good as it can be, the whole front of the motorhome is a grille so there is no restriction other than the oil cooler and intercooler. i cannot relocate the transmission cooler, it is too big and the oil lines too large. the radiator does not cool the transmission, too much restriction and too small of line sizes. i do have a bit more room in my shroud and could up my fan size a bit, running a 19" now, i could bump up to 20" which would bring the fan 1/2" closer to the shroud, i would gain from fan size increase but also from gained efficiency because of tighter clearances at the blade tip.
 

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Stuck in Commiefornia...
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Ok, so to get more air flow through the radiator you'll need to manage the air flow better.

The first thing I'll suggest is you need to seal the heat exchanger area up so the air must travel through the exchangers and not around them. This is easily done with 1/8" thick fiber reinforced rubber sheets. You can attach them to the walls of the compartment in front of the exchangers and allow them to go as far back as the coolers making a gentle fold onto the edges or the face of the rear-most cooler.

The second thing is a fan shroud. If you don't have one, you need one. If it's a 7.3 Powerstroke radiator from a super duty, get a fan shroud for a 99-03 7.3 truck or van. You'll want to size the fan to make best use of the shroud of vice-versa, or build a shroud to work with your existing fab. I don't think you can get electric fans large enough for your needs.

Third, exterior aerodynamics. Back in 1987, Ford sealed the upper grille opening on the Mustang GT. Looked cool but created an airflow problem. So the engineers and aerodynamicists figured out that a 3" plastic air dam the width of the radiator forced enough air up into the bumper cover and then through the radiator to cool the cars sufficiently. Placing the air dam directly under the radiator served two purposes though. The first was forcing air up into the bumper, the second was that it creates a low pressure area on the engine compartment behind the radiator, and this is the actual reason the cars ran sufficiently cool. Take that ugly piece of plastic off and prepare to overheat those cars.

Airflow is your next mod.


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