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Discussion Starter #1
Draining the rear/rear diff. fluid yesterday and a couple shards of metal were on the plug. Put my finger up inside and pulled out a longer piece. Put them all together and they form almost a compete circle about 3" across or so. Looks to me like the end of the outer cage on a bearing. So out it comes for a look see.

Never pulled a diff myself. What is the best way to take up the weight to slide the diff forward & out, and lower it to the ground so I can drag it out. I have a big floor jack but not a tranny jack. Have a come-a-long to lift from above but it is too long to get under the box. Should I get a small chain hoist? Also, is it easiest to jack up the rear axle for ground clearance and drag the diff. out the back? I have walking beam suspension so not much clearance to pull it out the side.

The nice thing about this site is I feel more confident doing more of my own repairs because of the willingness of people to share their experience and advice. Pulling a diff. isn't rocket science but I am sure there is a hard way and a smart way to do it. Left to my own brilliance I would surely do it so it looked like a government job (fubar).
 

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Big Cam Power!!!!!
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Draining the rear/rear diff. fluid yesterday and a couple shards of metal were on the plug. Put my finger up inside and pulled out a longer piece. Put them all together and they form almost a compete circle about 3" across or so. Looks to me like the end of the outer cage on a bearing. So out it comes for a look see.

Never pulled a diff myself. What is the best way to take up the weight to slide the diff forward & out, and lower it to the ground so I can drag it out. I have a big floor jack but not a tranny jack. Have a come-a-long to lift from above but it is too long to get under the box. Should I get a small chain hoist? Also, is it easiest to jack up the rear axle for ground clearance and drag the diff. out the back? I have walking beam suspension so not much clearance to pull it out the side.

The nice thing about this site is I feel more confident doing more of my own repairs because of the willingness of people to share their experience and advice. Pulling a diff. isn't rocket science but I am sure there is a hard way and a smart way to do it. Left to my own brilliance I would surely do it so it looked like a government job (fubar).
Excuse my dumbness the shards of metal would indicate something going on in the gears correct?
 

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I have a set of ramps on my shop floor, about 10 in thick and 25 ft long (old bridge timbers), I run trucks up on them then I can fit underneath better. I use an engine hoist to lower the pig to the floor then slide it out from under the axle.

Log hauler, if a bearing cage comes apart the rollers can roll up to each other and can bind up pretty hard, sometimes hard enough to take the interaxle driveshaft out. Caught early new bearings and seals and back to work.
 
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Big Cam Power!!!!!
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I have a set of ramps on my shop floor, about 10 in thick and 25 ft long (old bridge timbers), I run trucks up on them then I can fit underneath better. I use an engine hoist to lower the pig to the floor then slide it out from under the axle.

Log hauler, if a bearing cage comes apart the rollers can roll up to each other and can bind up pretty hard, sometimes hard enough to take the interaxle driveshaft out. Caught early new bearings and seals and back to work.
I'm beginning to fill like a diesel mechanic this website needs to give out degrees for diesel knowledge obtain from this site ..keep it up!!
 

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You can jack up each wheel and put blocks under them to get it high enough to get the diff out.
I take it you have a dump box you can lift and block the box, then use a come along off the box as a hoist.
Drain it, remove the axles before you lift it up they do come out easier.
 

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I've found that putting a couple of studs in the bolt holes on either side to slide the 3rd member out on helps too. They really come in handy when it's time to come back together.
 

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To pull it out and put it in I welded a couple of 5/8 clevis pins into a length of chain and use that to remove it and install. I welded them so the cotter pin is in line with the chain, so when you pull the case back a 1/4 inch you can put the pin in and secure the case, same as when you are putting it in. You are not messing up an area of silicone. Just a thought!
 

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To pull it out and put it in I welded a couple of 5/8 clevis pins into a length of chain and use that to remove it and install. I welded them so the cotter pin is in line with the chain, so when you pull the case back a 1/4 inch you can put the pin in and secure the case, same as when you are putting it in. You are not messing up an area of silicone. Just a thought!
Now that is a GOOD plan :guitar
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ok, so far so good. First thing learned today: Remove U-joint and loosen pinion nut BEFORE removing axles. I pulled the axles first and then driveline and yoke rotated freely which made it a little more difficult to unfasten things. The diff. is now half out hanging on a chain hoist. Got tired of trying to work it out of the housing and off the studs. Start fresh in the morning. Thanks for the ideas and suggestions. Looks like I can jack up the passenger side enough to slide the diff. out from under the truck.

Johnp3, I'm not quite understanding what you are explaining about the clevis pins. I am wondering about the difficulty of putting the unit back in without messing up the silicone bead on the housing. So i'd like to better understand your method. Thanks for the help!
 

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What you do is take a piece of chain it does not have to be very heavy I used some that had a 1/2 inch space inside the link about 2 ft long got a couple of 5/8 clevises, you want them long so you can use them when the housing is thick. Take a tapered punch and force it threw the chain link, be sure the cotter pin holes are in line with the chain link, drive in the pin, and weld in place.
To keep the diff level I put a small chain threw the yoke, and around the lifting hook and twist it to get it level and work it out
I did not do gear work but I use to make a lot tools to make the jobs easier.
 

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It's almost impossible to not mess up the silicone bead. You will either stick you hand in it or a gear or the housing.

Best thing to do is wait till you almost have it in and then put the silicone on.

I use a trans jack but have used a regular floor jack. Just whatever you do, keep all fingers out of the way when pushing it in. It never fails to go hard has hell then when you get pissed and really start jacking around it pops in, on you fingers....

Also keep you legs out from under it if you're using a jack, just in case it falls.

If you're still having problems getting it out tomorrow.... ANd I don't like doing this, but just throw some plywood under it and just get you bars in there and wiggle it out till it falls. Only do this as a last option. I've had to do it a few times with stubborn rears.

Before you do that option, keep in mind it has to come out completely straight or the ears get wedged in there.
 

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A trans jack with an adapter works best but i have done it other ways too. What I like to do is as other members said, thread a few studs in the housing. I then put a small shackle in the upper bolt hole of the chunk and hang it from a chain hoist from the dump bed (keeps it pretty square). Get it so it is on the studs and then apply your silicone. Move it in close remove the shackle and run it home.
 

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Johnp3's method, in which you take a piece of chain , put 5/8 clevis pin thru the chain link, then weld the pin to the chain (so that it is in the position a bolt would be in if it was passed thru the link and a nut put on ) the pin is clocked to have the cotter hole parrelel to the chain ,in lifting position, gives you the pin end distance away from the housing. this method beats any thing that I have heard of for overhead lifting. simple , reusable. :woohoo
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK, now I see how to do the clevis and chain method. Thanks for the detailed explainations. I welded a couple links of chain to the top of the Diff. and that is what I am lifting with. I am going to get a clevis pin this morning, all of mine are too big or too small. The diff. is out about 3" out from the carrier all the way around but doesn't seem to want to come off the end of the three studs that stayed in the housing when I unbolted it. Just need to do a little up & down and a little cussin and it will be out.
 

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Another trick for "sticky in the housing" pigs is to get 4- 1/2 inch coupling nuts and a few different length bolts, thread a bolt and coupling nut together to make a spacer for between the flange and housing ,so that the pig doesn't rock in the housing
 

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If your floor jack has a hole in the saddle,weld a piece of pipe to a steel plate.Now you have a base you can mount all kinds homemade brackets.I usually weld two bolts sticking out the back plate to locate in two holes in the chuck,then fab a couple of brackets to hold the front. I also use a turnbuckle to help hold the tilt,making it easier to see-saw out under the frame.Same idea can be used for clutches-flywheels etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Second thing learned the hard way. With a two-speed rear end put it in low range and make sure it stays there. The two speed slider goes left and right. When it is to the right (high range) it sticks out past the opening in the carrier and the diff. will not come out more than about 3 inches. Pushed the diff back in, spun the gears until they meshed and I could slide it into low range. Then she slid right out. I can see two bearing cones inside that are bad, one on each side of the pinion gear. The rollers slide back and forth, the only thing holding them in is the pinion gear pre-load. This is a reman diff. with less than 90,000 miles on it. It is out of warranty but I will take the bad parts to the reman facility in Portland. It will be interesting to see what brand they are when my gear man gets them out. This same outfit remaned the front diff that was replaced several years ago and only lasted 2 1/2 years. The shop I use here in Salem gets there reman stuff from them. No more of there stuff in my truck!
 
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