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spanky63
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1992 ford F-350 with the 7.3 non-turbo diesel. There is a lot of oil leaking from the flywheel inspection pan. I think it may be the rear main seal anyone have this issue? Also is the seal replaceable without pulling the motor out?
 

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Senior Member
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381 Posts
Either the engine or the trans will have to come out. Trans is easier.You should get a speedi sleve kit when you do the job, as the crank will most likely have a groove in it where the seal lip runs. Also , when you put the flywheel back on, use thread lock , or you will have an even worse oil leak. Just a thought before I go out into the world today:knight---Bob---:goodluck
 

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Junior Member
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93 Posts
The new seal outer perimeter should also be coated with RTV, I used the grey colored RTV on my 1989 IDI non turbo. been going over a year now and not a drop came out. the engine had over 200,000 miles at the time, there was NO groove on the crankshaft and the new seal did the job without a sleeve. The transmission and the flywheel must be removed to do the job. Or pull the engine. It is easier to line the transmission up to the engine than the engine to the tranny.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
I've always pulled them together and replaced the pan gasket, front and rear engine seals, and transmisison front, and rear seal, (if an automatic). The torque converter has no choice but to bear upon the front seal when unbolted from the flywheel/flexplate in an orientation that is not on it's normal plane. Upon reinstallation, there is a good chance it will have a short lifespan before starting to leak if not replaced.
 

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Senior Member
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381 Posts
It's a good idea to replace the front pump seal while the trans is out, but not for the reason of the torque converter "hanging on it". If the convertor is in all the way, a little pressure on the seal is minimal. Not worth much; just MHO.---Bob (every thing else is good) Backslap, you didn't really think you could get away with a suggestion without someone trying to change it a little, did you?:roflol::roflol::roflol::roflol:. Your turn...
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
It's a good idea to replace the front pump seal while the trans is out, but not for the reason of the torque converter "hanging on it". If the convertor is in all the way, a little pressure on the seal is minimal. Not worth much; just MHO.---Bob (every thing else is good) Backslap, you didn't really think you could get away with a suggestion without someone trying to change it a little, did you?:roflol::roflol::roflol::roflol:. Your turn...
Disturbing the mounting orientation actually does shorten the lifespan of any existing seal so I have to stand behind my claim. I will never make a claim if I don't believe it. The cycles of hot and cold, along with starting and stopping, alter the molecular composition of the seal and the ability to do it's job. Any high mileage transmission has front bushing wear in the oil pump. This wear, (no matter how minute) is there and coupled with attempting to reuse an existing oil seal is taking an unnecessary chance so best to mitigate the circumstance for under $10.00 using a new seal at the front.

A good quality single lip oil seal with a garter spring is looking for no more than .003 clearance or concentricy to the oil sealing surface. A double lip seal with a garter spring looks for nor more than .0125 to perform the same function, (dependent on size). As they age the ability to remain supple decreases and this is why they really need replaced any time they are disturbed.

Of course I could be nuts too......

Touche'
 

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spanky63
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Backslap

My truck has nearly 250,000 on it. I would not replace the oil seal on the engine without replacing both the front and rear seals on the trans especially if the tranny has to come out anyway to do the job. I am always aware of seal failure and it just makes good sense to prevent future issues.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
My truck has nearly 250,000 on it. I would not replace the oil seal on the engine without replacing both the front and rear seals on the trans especially if the tranny has to come out anyway to do the job. I am always aware of seal failure and it just makes good sense to prevent future issues.
Sure is cheap insurance eh?

Get your steering issues ironed out?
 

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spanky63
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Backslap

Yes I got the steering issues resolved. I had to replace both the steering gearbox and the power steering pump. Now i am having an issue with the brakes. I replaced both calipers, both rear wheel cylinders, both rear brake lines, the master cylinder, and the vacuum booster. Now when I hit the brake pedal sometimes it is like stepping on a brick other times the brakes work fine. I am going to pull a 30' fifth wheel trailer with it on may 3rd and need to figure this brake issue out before then. Yea cheap insurance is right.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
Yes I got the steering issues resolved. I had to replace both the steering gearbox and the power steering pump. Now i am having an issue with the brakes. I replaced both calipers, both rear wheel cylinders, both rear brake lines, the master cylinder, and the vacuum booster. Now when I hit the brake pedal sometimes it is like stepping on a brick other times the brakes work fine. I am going to pull a 30' fifth wheel trailer with it on may 3rd and need to figure this brake issue out before then. Yea cheap insurance is right.
Usually a "brick" for a brake pedal but the brakes still function is the booster being defective. Are your front, and rear brakes working equally? Have you checked, or replaced the check valve in the hose leading to the vacume booster? Ensure the hose is not collapsing internally also. When the pedal is extremely hard to push down, try to lock the wheels in a parking lot to ensure all four corners are operational.

I've seen several of the check valves stuck and will not allow vacume to build in the booster through the years although not necessassarily in your application.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
Yes I replaced the check valve as well. No I have not checked the hoses yet I am about to replace them this weekend.
Do not use fuel line for the booster vacume line. You will need to get hose for this purpose so it doesn't collapse internally. Did the brakes bleed equally when put back together? If not, the proportioning valve could be suspect.
 

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spanky63
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
A first no the brakes did not bleed equally. However once I removed the new master cylinder and bench bled it then re-installed it they did.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
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929 Posts
A first no the brakes did not bleed equally. However once I removed the new master cylinder and bench bled it then re-installed it they did.
If you don't have a vacume bleeder to use on the vehicle, you must bench bleed the master. If they are working satisfactorily now, the problem you are experiencing is related to the booster, and/or vacume supply to it.
 

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Senior Member
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381 Posts
Disturbing the mounting orientation actually does shorten the lifespan of any existing seal so I have to stand behind my claim. I will never make a claim if I don't believe it. The cycles of hot and cold, along with starting and stopping, alter the molecular composition of the seal and the ability to do it's job. Any high mileage transmission has front bushing wear in the oil pump. This wear, (no matter how minute) is there and coupled with attempting to reuse an existing oil seal is taking an unnecessary chance so best to mitigate the circumstance for under $10.00 using a new seal at the front.

A good quality single lip oil seal with a garter spring is looking for no more than .003 clearance or concentricy to the oil sealing surface. A double lip seal with a garter spring looks for nor more than .0125 to perform the same function, (dependent on size). As they age the ability to remain supple decreases and this is why they really need replaced any time they are disturbed.

Of course I could be nuts too......

Touche'
:gotcha. That's the response I expected. I totally agree.Tag, you're it.---Bob::happymugs
 

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spanky63
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
As far as the seals I was even thinking about changing the timing gears while the motor is lifted and open to change the seals.
 

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Aimless Wanderer
Joined
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929 Posts
As far as the seals I was even thinking about changing the timing gears while the motor is lifted and open to change the seals.
I don't remember that engine using anything but sintered iron gearing in the timing. Not phonelic like light duty engines that strip off and chunk out. Best ask to be certain as may have changed through the years.
 
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