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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I've got an older camper that needs some attention in the rim department. Stock white rims that have started to rust. Put new tires on last year, since one blew out going to the Huntington area.
I've looked into powder coating ,but I'm not sure if that would be the best option. Anyone have experience with just sanding and repainting? Not sure what would be the best process to go thru to make something like that last.
 

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I'd vote sand or shot blast and powder coat. Rust in the bead seats leads to slow leaks or eventual pin holes. Check out craigslist guys who blast a lot are always looking for some work to throw in with bigger jobs. I had my western snowplow blasted pretty reasonable. I decided just to paint the plow with normal spray and some hardner. I restored my IH pedal tractor ( for my son) and had it powder coated- that stuff is nice.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
That's interesting. I've never heard of throwing in some rusty wheels when someone does sand blasting. Couldn't hurt to look into that. I've heard that powder coating can be kind of pricey.
Seems like a waste, but I've seen tire and wheel packages that made it seem like it would almost be better to swap out the old ones for new. Then again, after a blow out, I had new tires put on so wheels only would make more sense if I went that route.
 

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That's interesting. I've never heard of throwing in some rusty wheels when someone does sand blasting. Couldn't hurt to look into that. I've heard that powder coating can be kind of pricey.
Seems like a waste, but I've seen tire and wheel packages that made it seem like it would almost be better to swap out the old ones for new. Then again, after a blow out, I had new tires put on so wheels only would make more sense if I went that route.
Any blaster is looking for filler work. I just had a set of older split rims done last week along with 79 other pieces for antique trucks. I'll probably just paint the rims however with a good quality urethane product.

There are many different grades of powdercoating available. Some is very durable, some no better than spray can applied paint from a hardware store. The basis of whichever paint or powder you use is a clean base substrate. Sandblasting will provide this but will abrade and distort the surface. Powdercoat will fill this and yeild a smooth surface as will paint if enough thickness is applied. However, as coating thickness increases, durability decreases no matter the product. It is difficult to sand a rim face smooth but it can be done. Work spent with proper preparation is well rewarded.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any blaster is looking for filler work. I just had a set of older split rims done last week along with 79 other pieces for antique trucks. I'll probably just paint the rims however with a good quality urethane product.

There are many different grades of powdercoating available. Some is very durable, some no better than spray can applied paint from a hardware store. The basis of whichever paint or powder you use is a clean base substrate. Sandblasting will provide this but will abrade and distort the surface. Powdercoat will fill this and yeild a smooth surface as will paint if enough thickness is applied. However, as coating thickness increases, durability decreases no matter the product. It is difficult to sand a rim face smooth but it can be done. Work spent with proper preparation is well rewarded.
Glad you mentioned that, about the diference in powder coating. I was not aware of that.
 

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Since we live in Indiana were they love to use salt, the powered coat won`t hold up to well. I have had alot of powered coated parts and after acouple of years the coat starts bubbling and just falls off with rust under it. Look in the Indiana auto/rv magazine I bet you can find a set of nice new wheels that are polished for cheap. If not sand them real well and prime them and used the wheel paint that the sell at the auto parts store or use bedliner on them also. they make that in a spray can also for cheap also. The rubberized undercoat could be used and some of that can be painted any color over the top of it also. also the caliper paint in the spray can would work I used a caliper paint kit on my wife`s calipers on her tacoma, it comes with a cleaner and the paint levels its self. after 2 years they still look like I just painted them. Good luck!! :thumbsup
 
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Discussion Starter #7
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Well, I figure that the salt has probably not been a factor on these rims yet. I work with the guy who used to own it, and it was probably not used over once a season, if that.
I hear ya Astro on the auto and rv (b) book. I look in there from time to time myself without much luck.
Leaning toward just blasting off the old paint, repainting and then some hardener like weld engineer suggested. Thinking about switching to black also instead of white rims.
 

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There are trailers that are parted out. You could look for aluminum rims off a wreck. Or buy some less expensive aluminum ones and never have to do it again. Another option is the sand, primer and hub caps.
 
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I just looked in both A&B books nothing this week. There is a place up north there who has an ad for sandblasting and powered coating ect. The advertise wheel powered coating starting at $ 40 a wheel. My brother just bought a new bike trailer and the place he bought it from it was only
$100 to upgrade to the polished wheels and that was for 4 of them. So you might call a trail place up north and price some. If it was me I would just wire brush them use a rust converter and primer them and shoot some good black paint on there and call it a day. :clap
 
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Aimless Wanderer
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Keep in mind that steel wheels produced on the OEM level are not "spray painted" in the conventional sense using a quality undercoat, (primer) followed by a topcoat of which you actually see. They are painted via the electrostatic process which is the same as filing cabinets and metal office furniture are finished. This process involves electrically charging the parts to be painted positive, and negatively charging the spray negative or vice versa, (depending on application). The benefit to doing things this way is very little application film thickness and everything is covered due to the magnetic "draw" of the electrostatic field. Basically the paint is like a magnet to the steel part. The result is a smooth finish in only one step as the finish product is a direct to metal formulation, hence, no prime coat. That being said, try setting a file cabinet in the weather for a year and see how it holds up........

In the aftermarket to repaint steel rims it's prudent to sandblast them very clean, clean them again with a phosphoric acid based "wash primer", followed by either a two part epoxy primer/sealer, or the newer generation two part urethane based products. I'm pretty old school when it comes to coating products with time and history on my side to use epoxy products. After the proper dry time is allowed, the wheels are then topcoated with a high quality automotive or industrial type finish.

What you have on the finished end is a much more durable product than when the wheels were actually manufactured. When mounting tires ensure the tire laborer uses either plastic tire spoons, or a non contact type tire machine to not scar or gouge your finish.

From my experience with powder coating steel wheels: I don't personally like it. There is far too much temperature variation in the wheel and it fractures and peels. If you think about a wheel, the center were it bolts to a brake assembly is quite hot in comparison to the bead around the tire seating area. Couple this with cold wheel spash and the coating just doesn't seem to hold up well; again these are only my opinions. I feel paint holds up much better in the application. Again, just my opinions. If someone could figure out a way to not fracture the coating when they tighten the lug nuts, I'd be all ears.

You really do get what you pay for in paint products. There are good examples out there and not so good. Do a little research prior to purchase to avoid dissapointment. I use "Diamond-Vogle" industrial paint and undercoat for frames, wheels, and everything that is not on an automobile body. I also do not intermix one vendor's chemicals with another. Seen far too many failures from this over the years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sounds like from what Astro is saying I may be better off to look into wheels from a trailer place. As far as cost is concerned. I don't have any experience in doing quality painting. I do like to drive a nice looking rig though. That being the important aspect. (Quality in the long run is important too.)
 
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I agree if you want things to look good I would find a good set of polished wheels, polish them up put some wax on them to help and just repolish them every spring and they will look sharp! Adam's polishes makes an outstanding polish for wheels. It's all I use on my weld 18x10 dune *'s and when I get them shinned up they look as good if not better than chrome wheels. If not every years or so you`ll be repainting them, and powered coating will cost almost as much as buying a new wheel. What size wheel do you have and whats the bolt pattern? I`ll keep my eyes out! Your driven a sweet truck you want that TT to look as sweet also!!!!
 
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Discussion Starter #13
It's tucked away in a barn for the season, but they are 5 lug 15" I believe. Swap them babies out then I can clean them up and maybe see about getting some for the boat trailer.
Since no one will probably ever see my boat trailer I'll go ahead and say that I have white rims on the boat trailer too (rust free). One side has circles cut in the wheel and the other side has triangular holes. LOL!!! Must peolple never put 2 and 2 together to notice, but now ya'll know.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Your driven a sweet truck you want that TT to look as sweet also!!!!
Thanks, I was out hanging some tree stands and thought this might make a good picture.
 
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