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I have a 2004 F-350. Back in September my truck was having issues where I would come to a stop, and when I went to go, it wouldn't get any gas. Pedal to the floor, and nothing. I would turn it off and back on, and then it would work. After a while it started stalling when I stopped. I changed all of the fuel filters, still happened. Changed the TPS under the hood, still happened. Then we changed the gas pedal (can't remember the name of that sensor), and it ran like a dream.

Now it is 6 months later, and it's happening again. I am assuming the sensor is bad, but I am curious if anyone else has had this same issue, and what they did to fix it. I will be exchanging my part out today for a new one, but I am worried that it might be something more. I would really like to keep this from happening in the future if possible.
 

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Well, sadly I am a very uneducated girl when it comes to this beast I own. I assumed the TPS was the sensor attached to the pedal, but read elsewhere that it was under the hood. Either way, I replaced the sensor under the hood that has something to do with the throttle, and the sensor that is attached to the gas pedal. Forgive me for being a diesel truck virgin. But that is why I am on here! Please help me learn oh wise one!
 

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Well, sadly I am a very uneducated girl when it comes to this beast I own. I assumed the TPS was the sensor attached to the pedal, but read elsewhere that it was under the hood. Either way, I replaced the sensor under the hood that has something to do with the throttle, and the sensor that is attached to the gas pedal. Forgive me for being a diesel truck virgin. But that is why I am on here! Please help me learn oh wise one!
I am not trying to criticize you at all. We all have to start somewhere. The reason I am asking it to make what you are asking clear to all of us. There are many people who know more about this truck than I do. Harry is one of them and I am sure he will chime in. Don't be shy. :)
 

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Welcome fox1980. Best thing you can do is get a scangauge II so you can get some vitals on the engine. Does it start hard or stall?
 
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Maybe it was the FICM that was replaced before?

[I will be exchanging my part out today for a new one, but I am worried that it might be something more.]

Let us know what the name of the part is that is being exchanged, and if that helps fix the symptom.

Everything already mentioned could be a factor, especially a wiring harness fault.

And yes, as also mentioned, a ScanGaugeII is a very useful 6.0L PowerStroke tool to have and easy to use...
http://www.scangauge.com/
http://www.scangauge.com/support/x-gauge/ford-specific-xgauges/
http://www.bulletproofdiesel.com/ScanGauge_II_Digital_Data_Monitor_p/scan-gauge-data-monitor.htm

Harry
 

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The pedal assembly contains the TPS (3 sensors actually - for the purpose of reliability) and it is quite expensive. There are very specific codes for them when they fail. You might want to get the codes read - perhaps borrow a scanner from an autoparts store.

Several questions - what brand pedal did you buy - Ford or aftermarket?
Did you save the receipt? It may be under warranty.
What was the part number of the sensor under the hood that was replaced (and where did you buy it)?
Can you describe the sensor under the hood that was replaced? Size, exact location (like on the passenger valve cover or up against the driver's side firewall) and type of electrical connector(s)? Better yet - post a pic.

As lenzhotrod suggested, the wiring sounds like the most logical area to scrutinize. That being said, without the help of a scan tool like the scangauge (and without codes), we would just be guessing.
 

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I am not trying to criticize you at all. We all have to start somewhere. The reason I am asking it to make what you are asking clear to all of us. There are many people who know more about this truck than I do. Harry is one of them and I am sure he will chime in. Don't be shy. :)
I was just being a smart *****. I did a bunch of research the first time this happened, and apparently got things mixed up verbiage wise. However, when I went to the parts store yesterday to pick up the pedal assembly to replace it, the gentleman told me that it was called the accelerator pedal position censor. The box even said it. And he told me the TPS is near the engine block and has to be replaced under the hood... So now I am confused again.

But, I changed the pedal assembly and so far so good. But I haven't put many miles on it yet, so we will see.
 

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Maybe it was the FICM that was replaced before?

[I will be exchanging my part out today for a new one, but I am worried that it might be something more.]

Let us know what the name of the part is that is being exchanged, and if that helps fix the symptom.

Everything already mentioned could be a factor, especially a wiring harness fault.

And yes, as also mentioned, a ScanGaugeII is a very useful 6.0L PuowerStroke tool to have and easy to use...
http://www.scangauge.com/
http://www.scangauge.com/support/x-gauge/ford-specific-xgauges/
http://www.bulletproofdiesel.com/ScanGauge_II_Digital_Data_Monitor_p/scan-gauge-data-monitor.htm

Harry
I changed the accelerator pedal position sensor (gas pedal assembly). I got the new one last night, and it drove fine. But I didn't go far. We will see how it does today. I will fill you all in at the end of the day. BTW, what is FICM? I'm not familiar with much of these abbreviations. Thanks for the information!
 

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The pedal assembly contains the TPS (3 sensors actually - for the purpose of reliability) and it is quite expensive. There are very specific codes for them when they fail. You might want to get the codes read - perhaps borrow a scanner from an autoparts store.

Several questions - what brand pedal did you buy - Ford or aftermarket?
Did you save the receipt? It may be under warranty.
What was the part number of the sensor under the hood that was replaced (and where did you buy it)?
Can you describe the sensor under the hood that was replaced? Size, exact location (like on the passenger valve cover or up against the driver's side firewall) and type of electrical connector(s)? Better yet - post a pic.

As lenzhotrod suggested, the wiring sounds like the most logical area to scrutinize. That being said, without the help of a scan tool like the scangauge (and without codes), we would just be guessing.
I purchased all my items from the auto part store. The on under the hood (which the auto part store(s) are calling the TPS), and the fule pedal assembly (accelerator pedal position sensor). I would have to get my husband to show me the sensor under the hood. I just bought that part and gave it to him to change. I just changed the pedal assembly. When I went to the parts store(s), they seemed to busy to help me. Not sure if it was because I'm a girl or not, but I was given little info, and when I asked about hooking something to my truck to see if any codes come up, I was ignored. So it upset me and I left. I would rather spend the money and buy the thing rather than deal with people like that.

Something tells me that if this continues, it's probably electrical. But the last time it happened, it worked fine after changing the pedal assmbly. Now 6 months later it's back. So I hope it was just a faulty pedal. Fingers crossed!
 

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I am not one to like to buy critical electronic and electrical parts from the autoparts store - they are usually pretty cheaply made. Regardless, I wish you well with it. Keep in mind that there are ways to get Ford parts at some substantial discounts. Joining FordParts.com is a start.

The sensors in the pedal are indeed called APP (accelerator pedal position) sensors. The assembly functions as a TPS (very similar to the 7.3L having an IDM and we have a FICM - serves the same function, different names). There is no other TPS. Not beating on you about it - just passing on information so that you all get to know your truck properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am not one to like to buy critical electronic and electrical parts from the autoparts store - they are usually pretty cheaply made. Regardless, I wish you well with it. Keep in mind that there are ways to get Ford parts at some substantial discounts. Joining FordParts.com is a start.

The sensors in the pedal are indeed called APP (accelerator pedal position) sensors. The assembly functions as a TPS (very similar to the 7.3L having an IDM and we have a FICM - serves the same function, different names). There is no other TPS. Not beating on you about it - just passing on information so that you all get to know your truck properly.
Thank you! I definitely want to get to know my truck properly. If this doesn't solve the problem, I will look into ordering factory parts. I never knew the parts store wasn't factory to be honest. One of the guys even told me he had to order the part from ford, so I assumed it would be factory. Good to know now.

Oh, and I made it to work fine... Hopefully it keeps on truckin, lol.
 

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Don't throw parts at it! Learn the vehicle and choose your parts and mechanics wisely.
Before we ever do anything to my truck, we research the hell out of the problem. Last time this happened, I took it to two mechanics that had no idea what the problem could be. Then my cousin that is a deisel mechanic was stumped as well. And after all the research, 3 things came up... Fuel filters (changed them), the sensor under the hood (changed that) and the accelerator sensor (changed that). Everything was reasonably priced, and didn't need a professional to change them. But if this new accelerator sensor doesn't work this time, it's goibg in the shop with a mechanic that knows these trucks like the back of their hand.... Or I'm trading it in, lol.
 

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You would be money ahead to get a scanner for your truck. You need to be able to read what your truck thinks is wrong, before throwing $$$ at it. Ford has a DVD that has all of the trouble codes and the service manual. helminc.com has them.
 

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Before going further, we need to know if your 04' F350 is an early or late 04' model, as there is a difference in the engine high pressure oil system components and locations.

Ford 6.0L PowerStroke has two oil pumps that share the same crankcase motor oil, one pump for the normal engine lubrication, and one pump for the high pressure oil supply to the fuel injectors. No or weak high pressure oil supply and the truck won't run. This system is called HEUI which stands for Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector and is unique to the 6.0L and the earlier 7.3L PowerStrokes.

The sensor under the hood that can cause stalling is the "ICP" sensor, stands for Injection Control Pressure sensor, this sensor monitors the high pressure oil supply to the fuel injectors from the high pressure oil pump.
Early 04' ICP sensor is located under the turbo, and harder to change.
Late 04' ICP sensor or what is known as an 04.5' yr model, is located on the top of the passenger side engine valve cover, and very easy to change.

There is no throttle sensor on the engine other than the egr throttle sensor on some yr model trucks, which has no effect on stalling.

FICM stands for Fuel Injection Control Module, it's located on top of the drivers side valve cover (big square-ish silver thing) and supplys the 48 volt activation signals to the fuel injectors, these have a high failure rate and can be repaired for fairly reasonable. When they malfunction they can cause stalling or no start or engine misfiring and hesitation. The FICM will only authorize voltage to the fuel injectors to start the engine if the PCM tells it the high pressure oil from the ICP is reading over 500 psi.

EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation)valve can cause poor driveability and excessive smoke, these get carbon coked-caked up and can stick open causing low power and excessive exhaust smoke and have a high failure rate, although most of the time they just need a good cleaning.

With a ScanGaugeII you can read all mentioned and much more, this is a must on these trucks for self diagnosis.

The first step in diagnosis is obtaining good useful information and some basic understanding on how something works that you are working on (this includes me or anyone)...check for fault codes...monitor the engine data and sensors to see if the parameters are in spec...and use the information to point the repair in the right direction as best possible.

If you end up using a good diesel mechanic, make sure like you mentioned that he-she has a well known reputable 6.0L PowerStroke background for fixing these trucks, as they are different than all other brands in respect to the fuel injection system.

Keep us posted Fox1980, were here to help and learn as best possible.

Harry
 
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