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What is the Biggest Trailer you can Tow before you need a CDL License? I know it will vary by State, Does anyone know what the Laws are by States and where to find them?
 

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Duramax/Allison
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here in Oregon, it's pretty strict, post the state you live in and I'll look it up for you..

here is the 3 CDL ratings for Oregon.... looks like towing in excess of 16000 with a truck like mine (10,000 GVWR) requires the Class B CDL since it's a total of 26000 combined weight, which is an easy one I think.. it's mostly a paperwork thing. The Class A is the big rig one.

Less than 26000 lbs combined weight, requires no commercial license.


http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/driverid/cdlclasses.shtml
 

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What is the Biggest Trailer you can Tow before you need a CDL License? I know it will vary by State, Does anyone know what the Laws are by States and where to find them?
We really need much more information to give an accurate answer.

Tell us what you are trying to do first, it will be much easier to figure out from there. Biggest can mean so many things, length, width, height, weight. All of which may or may not play a role. Also, what will you be towing with. Obviously the size of the trailer is not the only thing to consider.

her is the info you requested for all 50 states
http://www.towingworld.com/articles/TowingLaws.htm
That site doesn't cover everything and is very vague.
 

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here in Oregon, it's pretty strict, post the state you live in and I'll look it up for you..

here is the 3 CDL ratings for Oregon.... looks like towing in excess of 16000 with a truck like mine (10,000 GVWR) requires the Class B CDL since it's a total of 26000 combined weight, which is an easy one I think.. it's mostly a paperwork thing. The Class A is the big rig one.

Less than 26000 lbs combined weight, requires no commercial license.


http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/driverid/cdlclasses.shtml
Not 100% true.

Your statement for Class B, frankly confuses the heck out of me, LOL. SO I will just copy paste, from the link you posted. Plus, it's hardly a paperwork thing. The only thing different between obtaining a Class A and a Class B, is with the Class A you must take the test in a combined vehicle, with either a pintle hitch or fifth wheel. Ball hitch, or gooseneck hitch doesn't count. You would also have to take the test in a vehicel equipped with air brakes, if that is what you plan on using. No air brakes on the test, means no air brakes per your license.

These are the exact same requirments, etc. that the State of Florida had when I obtained my Class "A" CDL, about 8 years ago.

A Class B CDL authorizes the operation of any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight (GVW) and gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVW or GVWR. A person may not operate any vehicle for which a specific endorsement is required unless the person obtains that endorsement.
To Qualify/Apply

In order to qualify and apply, you must:

Possess or qualify for a non-commercial Class C driver license;
Complete a Commercial Driver License Application (Form 735-175);
Provide proof of your full legal name, each time you apply;
Provide proof of your legal presence in the U.S., identity and date of birth, each time you apply;
Provide proof of your Social Security Number, each time you apply;
Provide proof of your Oregon residence address, each time you apply;
Pass the CDL General Knowledge Test;
Pass a Pre-Trip Vehicle Inspection Test (Section 11 of the CDL Manual);
Pass a Basic Control Skills Test (Section 12 of the CDL Manual)
Pass a behind-the-wheel Drive Test (Section 13 of the CDL Manual) in a Class B commercial vehicle;
Present a valid DOT Medical Certificate with waivers or exemptions as required; and
Pay the appropriate fees (See note on payment of test fees)
Note: The Pre-Trip Inspection, Basic Control Skills and Drive Tests may be conducted by DMV or by a Third Party Tester.
 

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In Florida, under 26k pounds ( GVW) and less than 80" wide, no CDL is required.
 

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Duramax/Allison
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I guess I confused my self with my own link.. you're right. In a nutshell, if it weighs less than 26K combined weight, it's ok to drive it with a normal non-CDL (at least in OR).
 

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I guess I confused my self with my own link.. you're right. In a nutshell, if it weighs less than 26K combined weight, it's ok to drive it with a normal non-CDL (at least in OR).
Not if it weighs less than 26K, if it's GVWR is less than 26K.

i.e. - Say you have a dump truck, GVWR might be 70K, but lets say it weighs 25K empty. You can't drive that legally, even empty without a Class B license.
 

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Once you get technical, a gooseneck trailer with a GVWR of lets say 20K (dual tandem axle, 10K each axle) pulled by a 3/4 ton truck would need a driver with a Class A (acutally in Florida for instance you would need a min. Class A.5 since you would not need a fifth wheel). Since this setup has ability of Grossing more than 26K.
 

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What is the Biggest Trailer you can Tow before you need a CDL License? I know it will vary by State, Does anyone know what the Laws are by States and where to find them?
If you are a CA resident, 10k GVWR.

Everywhere else is the same.

Let's assume you you have a truck with a GVWR of 10k or less than you could tow a 16k GVWR trailer.

Truck with 12k GVWR of less than a 14k trailer.

If the trailer is over 10k GVWR then as long as the combined GVWR (truck + trailer) is less then 26k you are good to go.
 

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Built Not Bought
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Well for the job i do Hauling Campers Commercially. I only have a Class E Chauffeurs License to be honest i don't know what i can haul legally own my own free will on any giving day...now lets say i go the yard to get a camper to haul from A to B my GVWR on my truck is 9,000lb i best make sure the GVWR of the trailer I'm towing is under 17,000lb and no more than 2 axles! I'm not allowed to use scaled weight instead i get gross combined weight make sense???
 

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This is one of the most confusing arguments around. Since the information comes from government workers, and I use "workers" loosely, it is never clear.

26000 lbs is the magic number. if the vehicle itself is rated over 26000 lbs a cdl is needed if the combined weight of the truck and trailer is over 26000 a cdl is needed.

it is the GVWR of both the truck and the trailer. NOT what is actually weighs.

In years past it was the registered weight. Buy a truck rated for 33000 register it for 25999 and NO CDL.

How do I know I got caught after NY changed this to the GVWR some 15-20 years ago.
 
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Where did you get this information from, it is not correct.
Fl. DOT, you are right in it's GVWR instead of GVW. I turned in my class B years ago, due to conflict with the fire department. Due to having a B CDL, I could not drive our combo tanker, even though I had the tanker endorsement. I went back to a D with the 'E'mergency endorsement, which allowed me to drive ANY emergency vehicle.
 

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Fl. DOT, you are right in it's GVWR instead of GVW. I turned in my class B years ago, due to conflict with the fire department. Due to having a B CDL, I could not drive our combo tanker, even though I had the tanker endorsement. I went back to a D with the 'E'mergency endorsement, which allowed me to drive ANY emergency vehicle.
The 80" part isn't correct.
 

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Hmmmm. Not necessarily.

You could have a CGVWR of 36,000 and not need a CDL. Basically a trailer at 10k or less GVWR doesn't count in the configuration so 26k GVWR truck + 10 GVWR trailer = 36,000 and No CDL.
Wrong.
The trailer weight capacity does count.
10K on the trailer and you need a CDL.
The Highway Patrol does give drivers a break now and then when there is a question but 26001 lbs and there are no excuses. If you are driving a dump truck you need a CDL. If you are getting paid to drive you need some kind of CDL.
 
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