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Just wondering what everyones MPG has dropped now that the winter fuel is came into play. My 2002 has dropped a solid 1 MPG which I think it bizzare considering my 98.5 will drop 3-5 MPG on Winter fuel.
 

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Mine is way down. I'm going to try switching the fuel filter out, and I've had my foot in it A LOT more with the new trans. But I hit an all time low of 14.6mpg which is not cool, so I'm hoping a new fuel filter will help me regain some of that.
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I could have probably saw more of a drop in 2002 but I'm rarely bringing it up above the speed limit so far. Which is the total opposite of my 98.5.
 

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Mine is way down. I'm going to try switching the fuel filter out, and I've had my foot in it A LOT more with the new trans. But I hit an all time low of 14.6mpg which is not cool, so I'm hoping a new fuel filter will help me regain some of that
Just curious, but what is the corelation between a dirty fuel filter and MPG? I have heard this before and was trying to figure out how it affects mileage
 

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You know, I'm really not sure. It has to be some sort of restriction or extra strain on the system that causes it. Because when my fuel filter gets clogged, my power falls off, the smoke isn't as thick and my milage drops too. I think running the bio-d pushed a lot of junk out of my tank and clogged the filter pretty quickly this time around.
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hopeful 6.0 said:
Just curious, but what is the corelation between a dirty fuel filter and MPG? I have heard this before and was trying to figure out how it affects mileage
sstockton said:
You know, I'm really not sure. It has to be some sort of restriction or extra strain on the system that causes it. Because when my fuel filter gets clogged, my power falls off, the smoke isn't as thick and my milage drops too. I think running the bio-d pushed a lot of junk out of my tank and clogged the filter pretty quickly this time around.
Sean
I don't know how it'd effect a PSD. But the trucks running the VP44 have to really watch it because of the obvoius reasons but also Cummins says that timing advance ,on a VP44, is dependent on the amount of fuel pressure it has. Anything else I really couldn't say.
 
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I know mine is a 12v, but I have lost between 3-4mpg so far. This has been the biggest drop I have witnessed in 6 years of having a Cummins powered truck. I am not sure if it is dumb luck or they have done something different to the fuel this year.
 

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I was wondering why my fuel mileage all the sudden dropped!

So they do something different in the winter to the fuel?
 

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Whats the diff between winter and summer fuel some sort of anti-gelling additive. I down 3 to 4 on mine and have been racking my brain trying to figure out why.
 

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I think they blend #1 and #2 to lower the gelling point of the fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Bouncer said:
I know mine is a 12v, but I have lost between 3-4mpg so far. This has been the biggest drop I have witnessed in 6 years of having a Cummins powered truck. I am not sure if it is dumb luck or they have done something different to the fuel this year.

They could be doing something different. Last year they were still phasing out LSD.
 
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They use a different additive package with anti-gel properties in it. Also the Cetane rating I believe gets lowered somewhat as well. Anyhow you get less BTU's out of a gallon Winter fuel than you do a gallon of non-Winter fuel. More BTU's equal more MPG.
 
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Phily 911 said:
They could be doing something different. Last year they were still phasing out LSD.
I guess it could very well be this is the first full Winter of nothing but ULSD Winter blend at the pumps. I never really thought about that, but you are right as they were phasing LSD out.
 

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Bouncer said:
They use a different additive package with anti-gel properties in it. Also the Cetane rating I believe gets lowered somewhat as well. Anyhow you get less BTU's out of a gallon Winter fuel than you do a gallon of non-Winter fuel. More BTU's equal more MPG.
No... CETANE RATING is RAISED!

The high the cetane the easier to ignite the fuel but ther lower the BTU's become more energy it has... Chevron here in Idaho is running roughly 47-48 CETANE but during the summer its down around 41-43 CETANE...

Always remember that high the cetane levels are always used in the winter time... That why you MPG numbers are falling...

There is roughly 147,000 BTU in summer blend #2 diesel
There is roughly 139,000 BTU's in winter blend #1 diesel...

All current cetane additives have less than 20,000 BTU's before adding to fuel... The reduces the BTU's greatly and increase the CETANE rapidly... The flash point of these additive are extremely low... You might want to read over my 2 cycle oil information...

My Fuel and 2 Cycle Oil Information pages...
http://mopar.mopar1973man.com/2002%20Dodge/Tips%20&%20Tricks/2%20cycle%20oil/2_cycle_oil.htm

Mopar's Web site said:
There is no benefit to using a higher cetane number fuel than is specified by the engine's manufacturer. The ASTM Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils (D-975) states, "The cetane number requirements depend on engine design, size, nature of speed and load variations, and on starting and atmospheric conditions. Increase in cetane number over values actually required does not materially improve engine performance. Accordingly, the cetane number specified should be as low as possible to insure maximum fuel availability." This quote underscores the importance of matching engine cetane requirements with fuel cetane number!!!
 
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Mopar1973Man said:
No... CETANE RATING is RAISED!

The high the cetane the easier to ignite the fuel but ther lower the BTU's become more energy it has... Chevron here in Idaho is running roughly 47-48 CETANE but during the summer its down around 41-43 CETANE...

Always remember that high the cetane levels are always used in the winter time... That why you MPG numbers are falling...

There is roughly 147,000 BTU in summer blend #2 diesel
There is roughly 139,000 BTU's in winter blend #1 diesel...

All current cetane additives hav less than 20,000 BTU's when added to fuel... The reduces the BTU's greatly and increase the CETANE rapidly...

[/B]
Well now that Mike has made me look like a clueless arse again, there is the right info. :pointlaugh

I will go climb back under my rock now. :thanks:
 

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Bouncer said:
Well now that Mike has made me look like a clueless arse again, there is the right info. :pointlaugh

I will go climb back under my rock now. :thanks:
Relax... :bow:

You make the common mistake everyone does... Like OCTANE that is where everyone thinking is... The higher the octane the better performance... Because its flash point is highier and the burn rate is slower...

Now on cetane...

Highier the cetane the lower the auto-ignition temp is. (reverse of octane). But at the same time of reducing the auto-ignition temps you reducing the BTU values by using additive with extremely low flash points and low BTU's.

This is why I have a hard time believing anyone using a CETANE booster is getting better MPG's and more HP... I've see a test done with #2 diesel and #2 diesel with a very common cetane booster... It reduced the HP/TQ considerable amount like -50 HP...

We need cetane reducers... Get down to low 40's...:popcorn:
 

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As I understand it, diesel is a paraffin based fuel, essentially wax. During the winter the wax tends to crystallize plugging things up, so the winter fuel is made with a lower percentage of paraffin, to keep this from happening. Since paraffin is the source of power, a lower percentage means less potential energy, and fewer btu's released when burning it, which results in less power and lower fuel economy.
Sean
 

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sstockton said:
As I understand it, diesel is a paraffin based fuel, essentially wax. During the winter the wax tends to crystallize plugging things up, so the winter fuel is made with a lower percentage of paraffin, to keep this from happening. Since paraffin is the source of power, a lower percentage means less potential energy, and fewer btu's released when burning it, which results in less power and lower fuel economy.
Sean
Then they blend in things like naptha, xylene, and mineral spirits to reduce the auto-ignition temperature of the fuel to ease starting of the engine on cold winter mornings...

So between having less parafin wax (#1 diesel or blended) and adding chemicals to decrease the ignition temps (cetane boosters) of the fuel you got a very low powered fuel...
 
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