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Discussion Starter #1
Wood cutting season in state land is opening soon through the DNR. And we have our permits and are ready to go. Except for one thing. I think we underestimated the weight of oak.

Our goal is to cut and split 50 cords of oak this season. And will be split between a few friends and family members to keep are butts warm in the winter. Up till now had planed on cutting/splitting 4 cords a day. And hauling it home in one trip, about 40 miles. On our PJ 12K lb deckover trailer bellow.



But after doing a little research. A cord of green oak weighs in at 5K lbs! I've hauled wood in the back of many trucks before. Not a full cord but would have ever thought I was approaching two ton in the back of half ton pickups.

Can any one confirm the weight of a cord of oak for me?
Has any one hauled this much wood at a time?
If so with what?

I guess I could just load up a few cords and stop by the creamery (only local scale around) and weight in. And zero in on how much wood we can haul on that trailer. Just kind of shocked that four cords is 20K lbs!

Either way post any pics of hauling wood!
 

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Depending on the variety of oak, it could come in anywhere from about 4400 lbs to 7800 lbs green. I've hauled mostly Black Locust, which ranges from 6000 to 7700 lbs green. Those weights are per cord. I wish I had pics from the last time I had the truck and trailer loaded (16x6.5' trailer, 8'bed, old 460 gasser truck). Not sure how much was in there, but it wasn't light. Only pic I have of any wood hauling is some rain soaked stuff in the back of my 87 F250.
 

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Wood heat is soooo much cheaper than gas or electric.
Just a little more labor intensive
I hauled 5 loads like this for last winter on
my 16ft car trailer
 

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Sorry, no photos but it all brings back great memories! When I was young my parents bought a bunch of woodland property, selectively logged it, and planted Christmas trees in the new clearings. There was a ton of leftover wood from the logging. We would go up there every weekend and cut and split the wood, and my dad bartered firewood for most of the outside labor on the house we were building. We had my grandpa's dump truck, a 3-axle 1953 GMC that he bought new, and built the dump mechanism and demolition bed from scratch. During that time period we went through two gas engines in the dump truck, so my dad bought a Freightliner and moved the dump bed onto it.

This past winter (which had record cold temps and snowfall for Portland) I finally got a heat exchanger for my fireplace. My heating bills dropped like a rock, and I managed to stay in reasonable winter shape by cutting and hauling firewood.

Regards,
Michael Pliska
 

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First year in our new house it cost $450.00 in gas and $225 in a month elc to heat it:gaah
The 2nd year we used the two fireplaces we had and it cost us maybe $1500 for the whole winter. But burnt a LOT of wood and used some portable propane heaters.:nunu:
The 3rd year we put an insert in one of the fire places and burnt a 5th of the amount of wood, and got out 4 times the amount of heat. We spent maybe $350 for the whole winter but still used the portable propane heaters on the back side of the house.:happymugs
This year hope to have two inserts going and no portables, but did install 3rd fireplace (unvented) which is mid house and have some propane logs in it so that should help
Cant wait to call the gas co and tell them to shove pipes up their a**!!:woohoo
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Well we built some sides for the trailer out of old floor trusses and are about 16' long. On our first load we had about 2.5-3 cords on the trailer. The next few trips we pushed the limit and scaled the truck. And ended up getting 4 cords on the trailer and she was right at capacity of the trailer. And was confirmed after stacking that load. So heres some pics.



 

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According to a woodweights chart I got off the arboristsite.com:

Wood Type Wet Dry (lbs/cu. ft.)
Oak, red 60 44
Oak, white 63 47

Arboristsite.com has a bunch of threads on wood weight, those guys love their wood and chainsaws like we love our diesels!

Hope this helps.

Al
 

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Time for a DUMP trailer Stang. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #9
According to a woodweights chart I got off the arboristsite.com:

Wood Type Wet Dry (lbs/cu. ft.)
Oak, red 60 44
Oak, white 63 47

Arboristsite.com has a bunch of threads on wood weight, those guys love their wood and chainsaws like we love our diesels!

Hope this helps.

Al

I'm on that board also. Good place. Already found some locals and entered a hot saw competition they had going.

Ya, I'd like to get a goose neck dump but for now I'll settle for what I got. And a little hard work never killed anybody!
 

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I use my 14' dump trailer. It makes the job so much easier. I drag everything out of the woods with a skidloader, stack it up nice and cut it. Then load it with the skidloader too. I have never weighed it loaded, but it feels heavier than hauling my TL150. Of course the dump trailer also weighs 4500 pounds empty.
 
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